Caroline Miller House, Baxley

Though largely forgotten today, Caroline Miller (1903-1992) was once a best-selling author. Her novel Lamb in His Bosom, which won the Pulitzer Prize for Literature in 1933, was critically acclaimed as one of the best first works of the Southern Renaissance. Miller was also the first Georgian to be so honored.

Born in Waycross to Elias and Levy Zan Hall Pafford, Caroline married her English teacher, William D. Miller, soon after graduating from high school. They moved to Baxley soon thereafter. While raising three boys in this rental house, Miller wrote short stories in her spare time. Aiming for authentic regional dialect and material, she ventured out into the surrounding countryside and talked with many old-timers, documenting the idiomatic speech and folkways of the Wiregrass region, which she would later incorporate into Lamb in His Bosom. As it depicted poor whites who didn’t own slaves, it was a departure from the romantic South of literature. It is widely regarded as one of the best available sources for this largely overlooked culture today. Margaret Mitchell even considered it her favorite novel about the South.

The Millers divorced in 1936 and Caroline married Clyde H. Ray, Jr., in 1937. The couple moved to Waynesville, North Carolina, where Caroline gave birth to two more children. In 1944 she published her second novel, Lebanon, which didn’t receive the praise or success afforded Lamb in His Bosom. Though she would continue to write prolifically, she chose not publish later manuscripts, largely to avoid the attention and scrutiny of the critics. She died in North Carolina in 1992.

Today, the house is owned by the Friends of the Caroline Miller House.

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Filed under --APPLING COUNTY GA--, Baxley GA

Craftsman Bungalow, Baxley

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Filed under --APPLING COUNTY GA--, Baxley GA

Eclectic House, Baxley

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Filed under --APPLING COUNTY GA--, Baxley GA

Abandoned Service Station, Lumber City

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Filed under --TELFAIR COUNTY GA--, Lumber City GA

Hageman House, 1896, Fitzgerald

This is the oldest house in the city of Fitzgerald, dating to the year the city was colonized by Union veterans; at the time of its construction it was considered a country house but is well within the city limits today. [I grew up just across a large pecan orchard from it]. It was built by original settler Adrian Hageman, who served as a corporal in Company D, 93rd Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, during the Civil War. His wife was Fannie Protsman Hageman, a native of Vevay, Indiana. It was restored by their grandson, Charlie A. Newcomer, Jr., in 1970.

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Filed under --BEN HILL COUNTY GA--, Fitzgerald GA

Finnish Community Hall, 1920s, McKinnon

This was one of the first public buildings constructed in Finn Town (as McKinnon was popularly known) after it was settled in 1921. It was registered as a church to avoid taxation but was never used as a church. Instead, it was a gathering place for the Finnish community. For a fascinating bit of Georgia history, with great vintage photographs, visit Ernest Larson’s website.

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Filed under --WAYNE COUNTY GA--, McKinnon GA

Gable Front House, McKinnon

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Filed under --WAYNE COUNTY GA--, McKinnon GA