Restored Tobacco Barn, Rye Patch

rye patch ga restored log tobacco barn photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2009

Barbara Hodges Grant writes: This tobacco barn belonged to my family . I strung tobacco there as a young girl. It was owned by William Hodges. My grandparents, the Sapp family farmed there, followed by Veda Sapp Hodges Hinely, before it was sold. (Many know it as the Hinely place today).  Aaron Hutcheson adds: I purchased this property in may of 1990, I had the barn repaired and replaced the shelters. It is in pretty good shape. Me and my family helped to build this barn in the early 1950’s. We worked at this barn putting in tobacco in 1953. A lot of love and hard work have been put in this farm. We have completely rebuilt the farm house. We have converted the farm from row crop to timber and pine straw. This is a beautiful home place.

4 Comments

Filed under --LONG COUNTY GA--, Rye Patch GA

4 responses to “Restored Tobacco Barn, Rye Patch

  1. Barbara (Hodges) Grant

    This Tobacco barn belonged to my family . I strung Tobacco there as a young girl. It was owned by William Hodges, my grandparents Sapp family farmed there followed by Veda Sapp, Hodges,Hinely Before it was sold.

    • Dawn hodges

      Hi Barbara,
      My husband is a Hodges from Glynn County Georgia. His grandfather Thomas W Hodges and great-grandfather Edward Clinton Hodges were from clinch county. Any relation to you?

  2. Jesse Bookhardt

    Brian,
    Love those old tobacco barns. The log ones were usually the oldest and the most typical up until the 1940’s when most were built of rough sawed southern pine boards. It is great that some are being restored. They were certainly a significant part of the South Georgia farming scene in the early and mid 20th century. The only things I see missing in this log barn are the stringing benches that would have been located at the exterior edge of the lean-to shelter. Though tobacco is a known health hazard, the growth and production of it has a very long commercial and cultural history in America. It is a native plant and was used by the Indians. At one time, it was of such value until it was used as money in North Carolina and Virginia.

    • aaron hutcheson

      I purchased this property in may of 1990, I had the barn repaired and replaced the shelters. It is in pretty good shape. Me and my family helped to build this barn in the early 1950’s. We worked at this barn putting in tobacco in 1953. There has a lot of love and hard work been put in this farm. We have completely rebuilt the farm house. We have converted the farm from row crop to timber and pine straw this is a beautiful home place.

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