Bond-Carroll House, 1908, Ben Hill County

ben hill county ga carroll farmhouse photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2010

Thanks to this excellent history of the house from William Carroll, it’s clear that this house has had numerous owners in its nearly 110-year history. I’m using the name of the first and last owners, as they occupied it the longest. Mr. Carroll writes: The Old Bond Place was said to have been built in 1908 by a family named Bond. The house was built as a twin or “sister” to a house in Fitzgerald, at 513 North Merrimac Drive and was owned by John Bond’s brother. The textured block the house is built of was said to have been formed from the sand in the yard. A mold was built in the yard. Blocks were formed or molded there, baked, and set to build the house.The exterior of the house has been routinely painted white trimmed in black with a black roof. In the 1990’s the roof was replaced. At that time no previous roofing was found. It is assumed that the roof at one point was tin, though today it is black shingle. The house’s original design  was square with a 10×10 protrusion outward from the front of the house. The house included four fireplaces down stairs and four upstairs. The house had a balcony, which sat atop the 10×10 protrusion, and two external staircases, one on the south side of the house and one on the east-facing front of the house leading down from the balcony.
In 1920 the house was occupied by Mr. John Bond. The census record reported that the property was owned by Mr. Bond without a mortgage. In 1930 Flora I. Bond lived in the house with her son, Eslie F. Bond and was widowed. In 1940 Mrs. Bond was living in the house with a son, Walter and his wife, Mattie. According to the census record the property was worth $1500 making it one of the most expensive properties in the Vaughn District of Ben Hill County.

In 1948 Will and Fannie Lee lived in the Old Bond Place. During his occupation Will and his wife lived on the first floor. On the second floor lived, for a time, his son Albert, along with Albert’s wife, Hollis and their two daughters. At one point in the house’s history it was owned by the Shinholster family. It was rented by the Wilkerson family on occasion and by Bobby Reeves on another occasion. Spence Walker owned the house during that time.

In 1961 Henry Carroll purchased the house and two hundred acres from Fred Moore. Mr. Moore was a timber-man from Vienna, GA. Mr. Carroll purchased the house and land for $3,000.00 a year for a period of 30 years at a rate of 3%. Upon his occupation he installed paneled walls, kitchen cabinets, a back porch, and a carport. Henry Carroll removed the balcony on the front of the house, the 10×10 protrusion, and the external staircases. He repaired the front porch roof, took up an inferior concrete slab, and poured a superior concrete base for the front porch. Mr. Carroll later sealed the eight fireplaces, removing one of the chimneys, and installed propane space heaters throughout the house. Mr. Carroll made the Old Bond Place part of a larger farm. He built a shop and a series of barns, and had modern grain storage installed. Prior to these improvements the land surrounding the Old Bond Place had a series of older, simpler farm stands. There was a horse barn near to the house, just the other side of the driveway. There was an outhouse away from the house. Mr. Carroll improved the water supply by having a deeper well dug and by building four irrigation ponds on his farm. Prior to this improvement previous owners had first drawn water from the creek which borders the property. Later they drew water from a simple well in the ground nearby. Later still a well had been dug and water pumped electrically to the house. In 1992 Brad Carroll, Henry’s son, bought the farm and house. It was at this time that a new roof was installed. The house remained occupied until 2013.Today the house has three bedrooms upstairs and one down stairs. At the time of construction indoor plumbing was unheard of. Today the house contains two bathrooms added at some unknown time in its past. Additionally, downstairs there is a sitting room, a small foyer, a large living room and a large kitchen.

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8 Comments

Filed under --BEN HILL COUNTY GA--

8 responses to “Bond-Carroll House, 1908, Ben Hill County

  1. Pingback: Bond-Morris House, Circa 1908, Fitzgerald | Vanishing South Georgia Photographs by Brian Brown

  2. Claire

    I am Claire Moore Knight of the Moore Family from Vienna (Dooly Co) GA who owned this property at one time. Although I don’t know when my grandfather, HF Moore, Sr. acquired the property, I do have some of our family history to add to the documentation. My family owned a sawmill & Lumber yard in Vienna as well as many acres of farmland. In the early 1950s, my parents Fred, Jr. & Jean Moore were planning to our family of five to this house. My parents took us down one day to show us the house & so my mother could get an idea of what would be needed to make it a home. While we were there, my dad received an urgent message his father had collapsed and was unconscious. We hurried back to Vienna but in a few days my grandfather passed away from a brain hemorrhage. His death in early April, 1952 changed the plans to move to Ben Hill County. My dad was an only child who was needed to take over the sawmill etc. We made quite a few Sunday afternoon drives just to go by the house. The story of the bricks being made in,the yard is as my dad told me. Think he was always sad we weren’t able to make this our home. I know it was not an easy decision for him to sale the house & land.
    I loved seeing this picture and am especially delighted someone cares & loves it today!

  3. William Carroll

    The Old Bond Place was said to have been built in 1908 by a family named Bond. The house was built as a twin or “sister” to a house in Fitzgerald, at 513 North Merrimac Dr.; at the end of West Suwanee St. This original house was owned by John Bond’s brother.
    The textured block the house is built of was said to have been formed from the sand in the yard. A mold was built in the yard. Blocks were formed or molded up there, baked, and set to build the house.
    The exterior of the house has been routinely painted white trimmed in black with a black roof. In the 1990’s the roof was replaced. At that time no previous roofing was found. It is assumed that the roof at one point was tin, though today it is black shingle.
    The house’s original design was square with a 10×10 protrusion outward from the front of the house. The house included four fireplaces down stairs and four upstairs. The house had a balcony, which sat atop the 10×10 protrusion, and two external staircases, one on the south side of the house and one on the east-facing front of the house leading down from the balcony.
    In 1920 the house was occupied by Mr. John Bond. The census record reported that the property was owned by Mr. Bond without a mortgage.
    In 1930 Flora I. Bond lived in the house with her son, Eslie F. Bond and was widowed. In 1940 Mrs. Bond was living in the house with a son, Walter and his wife, Mattie. According to the census record the property was worth $1500 making it one of the most expensive properties in the Vaughn District of Ben Hill County.
    In 1948 Will and Fannie Lee lived in the Old Bond Place. During his occupation Will and his wife lived on the first floor. On the second floor lived, for a time, his son Albert, along with Albert’s wife, Hollis and their two daughters.
    At one point in the house’s history it was owned by the Shinholster family. It was rented by the Wilkerson family on occasion and by Bobby Reeves on another occasion. Spence Walker owned the house during that time.
    In 1961 Henry Carroll purchased the house and two hundred acres from Fred Moore. Mr. Moore was a timber-man from Vienna, GA. Mr. Carroll purchased the house and land for $3,000.00 a year for a period of 30 years at a rate of 3%.
    Upon his occupation he installed paneled walls, kitchen cabinets, a back porch, and a carport. Henry Carroll removed the balcony on the front of the house, the 10×10 protrusion, and the external staircases. He repaired the front porch roof, took up an inferior concrete slab, and poured a superior concrete base for the front porch. Mr. Carroll later sealed the eight fireplaces, removing one of the chimneys, and installed propane space heaters throughout the house.
    Mr. Carroll made the Old Bond Place part of a larger farm. He built a shop and a series of barns, and had modern grain storage installed. Prior to these improvements the land surrounding the Old Bond Place had a series of older, simpler farm stands. There was a horse barn near to the house, just the other side of the driveway. There was an outhouse away from the house.
    Mr. Carroll improved the water supply by having a deeper well dug and by building four irrigation ponds on his farm. Prior to this improvement previous owners had first drawn water from the creek which borders the property. Later they drew water from a simple well in the ground nearby. Later still a well had been dug and water pumped electrically to the house.
    In 1992 Brad Carroll, Henry’s son, bought the farm and house. It was at this time that a new roof was installed. The house remained occupied until 2013.
    Today the house has three bedrooms upstairs and one down stairs. At the time of construction indoor plumbing was unheard of. Today the house contains two bathrooms added at some unknown time in its past. Additionally, downstairs there is a sitting room, a small forayer, a large living room and a large kitchen.

  4. Carles Smith Carroll

    My husband Andy Carroll and family have lived here since Andy was in 2nd grade. I CAN REMEMBER SOME KIDS AT CHURCH ASKING MRS. MARJORIE LEE CARROLL DID SHE HAVE A MAID , HER REPLY WAS YES, IT’S ME!

  5. Sandra Pitts Collins

    I remember this house as a child and remember going there though I cannot remember the family name. I always called it the stone building.

  6. Betty Courson

    I would love to know about it myself. I rode by that house on the school bus for nearly 12 years and always thought someone of importance lived there. Back in that time this large home was a mansion in my eyes and I have watched it fall from being a georgious home to one that has fell to the desolation of this world. I will continue to visit your web site. Thanks to my daughter for sending this to me. I never knew it exzisted.

  7. Thanks, as always, Joan! I hope your Mother enjoys it, as well; perhaps she could tell us more about its history.

  8. Joan Kiger

    My Mother and her family lived in this house some time in the 50’s. I called to tell her to check it out on your site! I love your photography.

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