Custom Hydraulic Manufacturing, Mershon

Jonell Williams Harrison shared some wonderful memories of Mershon: …actually it was never what you would call a thriving town..certainly not by our standards today. In the 50s we got a small new brick elementary school..later years it became a community center. There was Peacock’s Grocery & Service Station..[yes SERVICE]. There was a small grocery at the intersection/crossroads, a turpentine still by the railroad track, the post office. And over the years the farmhouses , many along the main road, were always with time being improved and/or enlarged as the farmer became more prosperous. In later years the children who moved away never came back to claim their rural south Georgia heritage. That’s why you see [or don’t see] crumbling, falling down barns and farmhouses. This is a story [with pictures] that has been repeated all across America . When these younger families get a little older they will be longing to go back to their roots..too late. The only ones to hold onto any part of our heritage are the ones who never left. Did I mention that when my generation [circa 1941] was grade school age, we walked to town to see movies..boards resting on concrete blocks in the post office!

4 Comments

Filed under --PIERCE COUNTY GA--, Mershon GA

4 responses to “Custom Hydraulic Manufacturing, Mershon

  1. No, actually it was never what you would call a thriving town..certainly not by our standards today. In the 50s we got a small new brick elementary school..later years it became a community center. There was Peacock’s Grocery & Service Station..[yes SERVICE]. There was a small grocery at the intersection/crossroads, a turpentine still by the railroad track, the post office. And over the years the farmhouses , many along the main road, were always with time being improved and/or enlarged as the farmer became more prosperous. In later years the children who moved away never came back to claim their rural south Georgia heritage. That’s why you see [or don’t see] crumbling, falling down barns and farmhouses. This is a story [with pictures] that has been repeated all across America . When these younger families get a little older they will be longing to go back to their roots..too late. The only ones to hold onto any part of our heritage are the ones who never left. Did I mention that when my generation [circa 1941] was grade school age, we walked to town to see movies..boards resting on concrete blocks in the post office!

  2. It’s heart breaking to see those pictures..That’s where I grew up in the 1940s and 50s.

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