John Flowers House, Manningtown

manningtown ga john flowers house photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2010

Nancy Manning Manus shared this wonderful history of the house and the Manningtown community: This is one of the early clapboard homes, which was built in the early 1900’s by John Flowers, who is a descendant of early pioneer John Flowers, Onslow, N.C. The John Flowers in Manningtown was a carpenter, who built houses for various people in Wayne County. He was married to Mary Lee Manning, another descendant of the very early Virginia pioneers from England. Most of the first homes in Manningtown were built by family and relatives of those in the area…Manningtown was once an active small town years ago. The railroad line ran at the end of Manningtown. The residents, especially the young men, traveled to Jacksonville and Savannah. There were stores there and a post office. The children walked to schools at the “crossroads” where John W. “Jack” Manning’s residence faced the road on the right, which was at that time almost the center of his 600 plus acres. He was a sea captain, and youngest child of Moses Manning III. 

7 Comments

Filed under --WAYNE COUNTY GA--, Manningtown GA

7 responses to “John Flowers House, Manningtown

  1. Bill Phillips

    The house is clearly visible on Google Earth Street View.

  2. Nancy M. Manus

    Manningtown was once an active small town years ago. The railroad line ran at the end of Manningtown. The residents, especially the young men, traveled to Jacksonville, Fl, and Savannah, Ga. There were stores there and a post office. The children walked to schools at the “crossroads” where John W. “Jack” Manning’s residence faced the road on the right, which was at that time almost the center of his 600 plus acres. He was a seacaptain, and youngest child of Moses Manning III. Every settler there served since very early 1700’s in the original colonies. John Manning was the first of my line, who arrived from London, England in 1635.
    NMM

  3. Sir:
    After contact with other long time residents of the very old settlement of Manningtown, the “abandoned” farmhouse is one of the early clapboard homes, which was built in the early 1900’s by John Flowers, who is a descendant of early pioneer John Flowers, Onslow, N.C. The John Flowers in Manningtown was a carpenter, who built houses for various people in Wayne Co. He was married to Mary Lee Manning, another descendant of the very early VA pioneers from England.
    Most of the first homes in Manningtown were built by family and relatives of those in the area. The old John Flowers home is probably now on the property of an elderly disabled son.
    Most of the people in Manningtown are true pioneer descendants, who were taught self-sufficiency at an early age. Most of the children became highly educated and moved away for successful careers. But few forget their roots and Christian upbringing. I am a writer, and I could spend hours on the subject, but briefly any Manning or Flowers you may meet are true pioneer descendants, who love God and country.
    Nancy Manning Manus

    • Thanks so much for this information, Nancy. I tried to send you an email yesterday, but it was returned, undeliverable. At any rate, I meant no insult by calling the farmhouse “abandoned”. That’s a term I often use when I don’t know the history of a house, or if it appears neglected or forlorn. I love the area around Manningtown, and its isolation. It took my traveling companion and me forever to find it. We spend countless hours seeking out such places, and I must say, Manningtown was among the most difficult to find…I will change the title of this listing to reflect your information. Do you know if Manningtown ever had an old store, school, or even a post office? I’d love to know more about this interesting little place.

  4. Sir,
    Where exactly is the supposedly abandoned farmhouse in Manningtown? My property, which is my parents old home place is located on the Manningtown Rd., and it definitely is not abandoned merely because the place has been stripped by thieves. It is not safe for any strangers to walk about on the farm as numerous poison snakes have been relocated there in addition to jaugars and other non-native wildlife without my knowledge or consent. I hope to hear from you.
    Nancy Manning Manus
    Descendant of John Manning,
    arrived in Norfolk, VA 1635

    • Nancy, I didn’t mean to imply anything bad about the house…it’s terrible that people will vandalize things just because they’re empty, or look a bit forlorn. I’d love to know more about your family and its history in Manningtown! Thanks for looking at the site.

      • Brittian Flowers

        Hi, just researching some hometown information and family history and come across this. I would love to speak with you, Ms Nancy. I come from Hortense, Ga. Born in 1988. Please message back

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