Moore Farmhouse, Double Run

double run ga herman moore house photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2010

Leon Calhoun writes: Herman Moore & later his son Jack Moore lived in this house in the 1940’s & 1960’s. Diane Gilbert confirms: This house did indeed belong to Herman Moore (my Grandfather…..aka “Bigdaddy”). In the early years, he lived there with my Bigmama….. aka Beulah Moore, and their 3 children…..Jack, Leo, and Mogene. Later on, he built and lived in the house shown and titled as “Abandoned Farm Truck”, and my uncle Jack lived in this house until his death.

7 Comments

Filed under --WILCOX COUNTY GA--, Double Run GA

7 responses to “Moore Farmhouse, Double Run

  1. Yes, the above info is correct. This house did indeed belong to Herman Moore (my Grandfather…..aka “Bigdaddy”). In the early years, he lived there with my Bigmama….. aka Beulah Moore, and their 3 children…..Jack, Leo, and Mogene. Later on, he built and lived in the house shown and titled as “Abandoned Farm Truck”, and my uncle Jack lived in this house until his death.

  2. Katherine Barich

    Hi Brian,

    I am a genealogical researcher and was intrigued by a show on AHC regarding the Honjo Masamune sword. The sword was given to “Coldy Bimore” (phonetic spelling), and a potential identification of this person is D.B. Moore, of Wilcox County Georgia. (See Wiki entry for Coldy Bimore.) Census records identify as D. B. Moore (also Dave B. Moore) from Double Run. Maybe this house is attached to a potential treasure hunt for Japan’s greatest sword?

    • Katherine,
      I may have some information we can share regarding your search.
      feel free to contact me at eric.dean (at) live (dot) com.

    • I believe the D.B. Moore you are referring to may very well be my great uncle whose name was David Moore, but was known as “Hank Moore”. I have no knowledge of any sword, but I do know that Uncle Hank was a soldier in WWI….I heard him speak of it many times.

  3. Herman Moore & later his son Jack Moore lived in this house in the 1940’s & 1960’s.

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