Commercial Storefronts, Warwick

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Hugh Gleaton writes: The tin clad building to the right of the post office had a doctor’s office in it in the late 40’s or early 1950’s. I believe his name was Dr. Flournoy. Regarding the post office, Louise McCord Jones recalls:  My great aunt Mrs. Rossie Britt was post mistress of Warwick for many years. In the mid- and late-1950s, I loved visiting with her and her brother, my Uncle Charlie Dupree, because they both had such jovial personalities, As a young mid-century female, I thought it very impressive that my aunt had risen to the status of Post Mistress!

22 Comments

Filed under --WORTH COUNTY GA--, Warwick GA

22 responses to “Commercial Storefronts, Warwick

  1. Louise McCord Jones

    My great aunt Mrs. Rossie Britt was post mistress of Warwick for many years. In the mid- and late-1950s, I loved visiting with her and her brother, my Uncle Charlie Dupree, because they both had such jovial personalities, As a young mid-century female, I thought it very impressive that my aunt had risen to the status of Post Mistress!

  2. Hey Hugh – Thanks for the input. I didn’t know that was Dr. Flournoy’s office. I do well remember that the large stained glass window above the choir was donated by the Flournoy family. Mimi’s name is on one of the front windows.

    Don’t you enjoy Brian’s photographs?

    • Hugh Gleaton

      I haven’t been in the Methodist Church in Warwick for probably 40 or more years so I did not know that Mimi’s name was on one of the front windows. I didn’t recognize your name. How did you know my grandmother Gleaton?
      And yes I do enjoy Brian’s photographs.

      Hugh

  3. Hugh Gleaton

    The tin clad building to the right of the post office had a doctor’s office in it in the late 40’s or early 50’s.I believe his name was Dr. Fluornoy. That name could be misspelled.

  4. Julie Moore

    The first time my husband, Alvin Moore, took me home to meet his family, I was introduced to Striplings. Looking at the pictures and reading the comments brings back many good memories. Thank you.

  5. Fred: That WAS Dickie that sent the last information. Mr. Frank passed several years ago, not sure exactly when, but think it was in the 80’s or early 90’s. The pool room was “run” for a while by a Mr. Paulk, one of my neighbors on the lake. I think it was not really a business…more of a place for Mr Paulk to stay during the day while his wife worked (I think she was a teacher, but don’t remember). Mr Paulk was not well thought of by adults in Warwick. I think he could become unreasonable and was certainly irasible towards other adults but he was always kind to my step brother and I…we used to go to his house just “up the road” to play checkers and chinese checkers for hours. I think Mrs. Paulk was happy for us to be a distraction for him, and we were happy for the games and stories he would tell us.

  6. Tom Griffin

    I remember the coke bottle game too. My grandfather used to take me to Mr Striplings when I was little and they still played.

    • Hugh E. Gleaton Jr., MD

      Tom,
      You were a little younger than I. Your mother, Clarete, was my third grade teacher at the school in Warwick. We were all, including you, members of the United Methodist Church in Warwick. I last saw and talked with your mother at my mother’s graveside service at the church in 2003. She was one of my favorite teachers!

  7. Rusty Hardin

    My Mother worked at that Post Office for 35 years and Grandfather, WoWo, owned Stripling Mercantile. We lived about two miles outside of town, but we kept our bikes in town. Really grew up on the sidewalks and streets of Warwick. We always had to be at the Post Office by five to ride home with Mama. It was really a vibrant little town in the late sixties. Lots of kids and lots of activities. Anchored largely by the railroad and the peanut mill and Warwick Elementary School. I remember the local farmers pulling cokes from the vending machine in the back of the hardware store, who ever had the one with the name of the closest town on the bottom of the bottle had to buy for all. The key was in the door of the vending machine and you made change for yourself. Back then, my Uncle James only made sausage when it was cold due to a lack of coolers. Loved the sign on Mr. G.B. Moores store, “G.B. MOORES Dry Goods and Ready To Wear Clothes”. Cousin Chris, selling boiled peanuts during peanut season from his roll away peanut stand on the sidewalk. Truly was Norman Rockwell-ish!

  8. Milton Parrish

    I just recently noticed the beauty of Warwick as my frisbee ended up in front of the post office. Me and my family spent Thanksgiving Day with family at Lake Blackshear and drove to Warwick to play on their wonderful playground!! Enjo all of your photos of history! From TyTy

    • Thanks, Milton. Warwick really is a pleasant surprise…You wouldn’t happen to be related to any of the Irwin County Parrishes, would you? If so, we might be distant cousins!

      • Fred Gleaton

        You mentioned your Pate relatives at one point. You know of any kinship to Mr. Pearl and Miss MIssouri Pate? Gleaton Road/Champion Road.

  9. Fred Gleaton

    The Gleatons were PO Box 84. The building to the right was, in the fifties and sixties, the city hall. To the right of that was Mr. Joe Frank Middlebrooks’ Gulf station. To the left of the post office was the original Striplings Grocery and Hardware, a business that was eventually swallowed whole by the Stripling’s Sausage Empire. Beyond Stripling’s was Heyward’s Dry Cleaners, Jones Grocery, the pool room, and Griffin’s Grocery.

    • Frank R. Moore

      Actually, to the right of the Post Office was Spillers’ Barber Shop in the late 40’s & 50’s. Down the street, between the pool room and Griffin’s was a Theater which later became G. B. Moore’s store.

      • Fred Gleaton

        Thanks for that info. I thought there was one more store front between the pool room and M.L. Griffin’s store but I think that it must have been empty by the time I was a kid (born 1952). Also, that barber shop was gone as well. If you wanted you head skint, jou had to visit “Mr. Bryant” out next to the store at Smoak’s Bridge (Mr. Thomason’s store). You are Frank Moore, father of David and Dickie, are you?

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