J. C. Little House, Circa 1870, Louisville

McDaniel House Louisville GA Jefferson County 7th & Mulberry Endangered Victorian Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2014

At the corner of Mulberry & 7th Streets stands this gigantic old house that is not to be missed when in Louisville. It’s presently for sale, I believe, but is in immediate need of stabilization. It would be a real shame to see this house lost. The original wooden shingles are even visible beneath the mid-20th-century roof and a quick scan of the realtor listing shows a beautiful staircase and interior that isn’t beyond saving.

McDaniel House Louisville GA Jefferson County 7th & Mulberry Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2014

Patty Romer Guill: My great-grandfather James Cain Little built the house in the 1870s or 80s. My grandfather sold it around 1920 (don’t know the buyer) when he built the red brick house on the corner of Green and 7th.

Kenneth McDaniel: My Grandmother (McDaniel) owned the house from about 1940 til her death in 1985. From my understanding, it was built in 1867-70. She had converted the right side of the porch (as you look at it) into her ‘beauty salon’ which was her primary source of income.  

Update: This house was struck by lightning on 20 July 2020 and was completely destroyed.

10 Comments

Filed under --JEFFERSON COUNTY GA--, Louisville GA

10 responses to “J. C. Little House, Circa 1870, Louisville

  1. Pingback: Louisville’s Little House Lost to Fire | Vanishing South Georgia Photographs by Brian Brown

  2. JDHRosewater

    J.C. Little House is on the market. See pix and info, (and hopefully more pix soon), here:
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2018/02/15/1876-gothic-revival-louisville-ga/#comment-179933

    Cheers! 🙂

  3. Kenneth McDaniel

    My Grandmother (McDaniel) owned the house from about 1940 til her death in 1945. From my understanding, it was built in 1867-70. She had converted the right side of the porch (as you look at it) into her ‘beauty salon’ which was her primary source of income.

    Whenever I pass through the area, I always have to stop by to view the house, unfortunately it does hurt to see it deteriorating in front of our eyes.

  4. My great grandfather James Cain Little built the house in the 1870’s or 80’s. My grandfather sold it around 1920 (don’t know the buyer) when he built the red brick house on the corner of Green and 7th.

  5. I heard from two sources that the bank (Queensborough) offered to repair the roof at no cost, several times before it got so bad, but were turned down each time.
    .

  6. Amy

    This is quite a find Brian! I think you should create a map with all your photos listed so that when I, or anyone else, visit the East Coast we can follow the map and see these amazing sites in person. Maybe you’ve done this already?

  7. aptharsia

    Wow! When it was listed, it was only $39k. The description stated it was built between 1865-1870, which seems right. Stunning home, I hope this won’t be lost to neglect or horrible future remodels.

    On Mon, Jan 20, 2014 at 9:49 AM, Vanishing South Georgia Photographs by

    • I’m sure it would take a lot to restore it. I found one realtor listing, on Trulia I think, that dated it to 1900. But I agree, it would be a real shame if it were lost!

    • Michal Godbee

      My grandmother lived here before buying the house across the street. We had many Sunday dinners there. When I was little, I played there and fell in love with the beautiful staircase. I spent many afternoons sitting on the screened-in porch.Great memories! Now, Aunt Ev owns the house.

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