Corinth Primitive Baptist Church, Charlton County

historic corinth primitive baptist church charlton county ga photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2014

Though some sources give dates for the Alabaha/Crawfordite churches, there is really no way to determine this as  they do not keep the type records which would validate these dates. Since this congregation dates to 1882, it is assumed that the church was constructed around that time.

historic corinth primitive baptist church charlton county ga plaque photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2014

The memorial pictured above is unique, so far, among these meeting houses. It states that the church was chartered in 1882 and first members were: Henry & Jane Prescott; James J. & Nancy Hendrix; David R. & Millie Wasdin; James & Ester Johns; and Sarah O’Berry. LeAnne Oliveira writes, in part: “The memorial sign was made by my daddy, John Prescott. After his retirement he returned to Charlton County and became very active in the upkeep of Corinth. The Prescotts on the sign were his paternal great-grandparents and the Wasdins were maternal great-grandparents. A board was formed to oversee the upkeep of the cemetery. Because the land was deeded by my great great grandfather to “the members” of Corinth Church the last two surviving members had to sign a quit claim deed in order to legally deed the land and church to the board. My father was buried here in November 2011 at the feet of his father. In order to be buried here today a person must have ancestors or blood relations buried there already. I have a plot marked off for myself and my husband, at the feet of my father. No meetings are held in the church any longer, but the Prescott family holds our reunion on the grounds every April. This church has always been a large part of my life and it sure makes my family tree easier to trace as I can cover half of it back four generations right in that cemetery.

historic corinth primitive baptist church interior charlton county ga photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2014

The interior is plain as are those of all the Alabaha/Crawfordite churches. Since this one has glass windows under the wooden shutters, I presume it is still an active congregation. There’s a privy on the grounds, as is emblematic of these churchyards, but there’s also a nice pump house.

historic corinth primitive baptist church charlton county ga pump shelter photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2014

The meeting house and a rather large historic cemetery can be found at the end of a dirt driveway. This is the view when you’re leaving or arriving.

historic corinth primitive baptist church photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2014

25 Comments

Filed under --CHARLTON COUNTY GA--

25 responses to “Corinth Primitive Baptist Church, Charlton County

  1. I was absolutely thrilled to find information on this beautiful church and beautiful little Cemetery. Having worked at a job site not a mile and a half down the road from old Corinth Cemetery, the sign intriguied me. Add to this that I’ve got my own YouTube channel and one of my favorite things to do is to discover and explore historical places, it drove me crazy until I finally decided that on my last day at the job site, I was going to pull in and check it out. I’m glad I did. When I got up to the to the gate I was relieved to see that the signed didn’t say no trespassing, it said please close the gate behind you when you leave. It was such a relief! I’m so grateful to all of you for sharing your family’s history about this beautiful church and this beautiful Cemetery. I took many video clips in many photos and I will share your page on my YouTube channel. My YouTube channel is the Palmetto Travelers. I will reach out and try to contact you to let you know when I post this video but again, I’m so grateful to you for explaining a lot of little intricacies that I noticed as I walked inside the church, being very careful and very mindful of where I was. I made sure to lock everything back and everything like it was. Thank you so much for sharing your beautiful Church, your beautiful cemetery, and your wonderful family history. I know my viewers will enjoy this video very much and I hope you do too. Thank you so much

  2. Charles Howell

    There are holes in the floor that sit about two to three feet apart. They were there so parishioners could spit tobacco through the holes during service.

  3. James C. Henderson Jr.

    I grew up going to the churches that my uncle, by marriage, Sammie Hendrix pastored. My parents, James and Josie (Smith) Henderson are buried at Shilo Primative Baptist cemetery in Blackshear. Daddy’s family are buried at Mt. Olive in Manor. We attended Mt. Olive until I was a young man and joined Central Baptist in Waycross, along with my parents.

  4. I love this church history. My grandparents,paternal, were Berry and Sarah Crawford Crews. Anyone know them.

  5. Jessica Warren

    My Mother is Carol L Johns Warren. Her father is Leroy Johns. His parents are Dillie Lovejoy Johns and Minnie Hickox Johns. Dillie’s parent my great great grandparent are buried at that cemetery. I am going to visit. Alot of my ancestors are buried there. “John’s family”

    I haven’t been there since i was 12. Im about to be 36.

  6. Alan Kaye

    Seems like some of these old church buildings had a women’s side and a men’s side with holes in the floor for spitting.

  7. Carol Batten May

    Thank you for the pictures as well as the information about your ancestors. I loved it. I am still trying to locate mine! They are in Charlton Co. I believe the church is Emmaus… possibly Primitive Baptist. Their community was once called Battenville where most of them are buried. I have been told the postmaster changed the name to St. George when his only son, George passed away. I wonder whether anyone knows anything about them or might be related to them.

    • Brenda Brubeck

      There’s some Battens on Crews Community Rd in Winokur. Are you related to them? I’m related to Crews and Johns.
      Brenda

  8. LOUISE MATTOX BRYANT

    Brian, I truly enjoy your photography and your writings. I have been told that I should have been born during the 1800’s because I love that time period ! I am familiar with Corinth , but I live close to Sardis Primitive Baptist
    Church in the Sardis Community of Charlton County. This church was formed in 1821 by prominent citizens of the community. A stroll through the cemetery tells the story of families who lived and died there and are now in this peaceful and serene resting place. I also have my Grandparents house
    which was built in 1890. I keep it up with the beds made up just like my Grandmother Mattox would want it. I use it for family and community events. When I’m there I feel like I am back in the 1800’s and that is a great feeling. Come for a visit sometime, I will probably be sitting on the porch
    in one of my old rocking chairs, just waiting for company !

    • Carol Batten May

      I’ve enjoyed reading and seeing the picture. I love this old history. My family were Battens and I’m seeking anyone who may have any connection to that family.

  9. I love this place it’s so peaceful there.
    Many of my family members are buried there on my dads side.
    My granny Phillips (who was Mary Jane Prescott Phillips) along with some of her children and also her parents were buried there.

  10. Jessica Harrell

    I enjoyed this very much as my grandparents and great grandparents are buried there. I am formally a Williams and this is where my daddy will be buried with his grandparents, dad, mom and all of his brothers and a couple of his sisters. It is so peaceful there. Bless be to those that are caretakers and those that help keep it nice and clean.

  11. Wendy Jones

    I love this old church. There are nails on the rafters for men to hang their hats. I heard the small holes evenly spaced in front of the pews is for spitting tobacco – not sure about that one.

    • John Eldon Smith

      It’s true about the holes in the floor,,i went there as a boy with my Parents.. my Mother’s only Brother Elder Sammie Hendrix was the last Pastor there. And he and his wife and Parents and many more of the family are buried there., along with several of our Lee relatives.I visit quite often.

      • Tonya Hendrix

        My husband is Sammie Hendrix Jr. His grandparents and other family members were founders, pastors and members of this church. Our family is buried there in the cemetery as we will be when that day comes. It’s a beautiful rustic church and we love going there often. Thank you for sharing this page. We moved away from Georgia 2 years ago and this page made me feel at home.

      • James C. Henderson Jr.

        Sammie Hendrix was married to my mother’s oldest sister, Annie Bell. I also came to this church every so often as a boy with my parents. We mostly went to Mt. Olive in Manor, since it was closer to where we lived, in Waycross.

  12. wendell a. theus

    Hi Brian, These are my favorite photos of yours I have seen yet. This old church building and many like it are the most demonstrative presence left by our forefathers. It simply reeks of simplicity, grace, strong-willedness, perseverance, faith, worship, (peacefulness), reverence and a hundred other similar descriptions. I would have a feeling of awe approaching this Holy place, more than going to the worlds finest worship halls. The simple sight of this old “fat lighter” (liderd wood to us in S. Ga.) wood frame, tin roof structure standing under our tall Ga. pines is awe inspiring in its elegance. Take that Vatican City (only kidding). Thanks, so much for your efforts and willingness to share with us all.

  13. I’m with Julie, I have many Wildes ancestors, along with Prescotts and O’Berry relatives, buried there. I still visit the church every time I’m up that way. Thanks for sharing this part of our history!

    • Thanks for being a “caretaker” of the church. I always think that the people who visit cemeteries of these churches whose congregations have passed on are the best guardians of local history. It does make you a caretaker and it’s very important.

  14. LeAnne Oliveira

    So glad you got down to Charlton County! The memorial sign was made by my daddy, John Prescott. After his retirement he returned to Charlton County and became very active in the upkeep of Corinth. The Prescott, s on the sign were his paternal great grandparents and the Wasdins were maternal great grandparents. A board was formed to oversee the upkeep of the cemetery. Because the land was deeded by my great great grandfather to “the members” of Corinth Church the last two surviving members had to sign a quit claim deed in order to legally deed the land and church to the board. My father was buried here in November 2011 at the feet of his father. In order to be buried here today a person must have ancestors or blood relations buried there already. I have a plot marked off for myself and my husband, at the feet of my father. No meetings are held in the church any longer, but the Prescott family holds our reunion on the grounds every April. This church has always been a large part of my life and it sure makes my family tree easier to trace as I can cover half of it back four generations right in that cemetery. Thanks for featuring it!

  15. Lanny Martin

    All of your primitive Baptist church pictures are truly amazing. There were several in East Texas when I was a young boy growing up in the 50’s and even the 60’s. They are almost to the last…. gone. Thank you for sharing.

    ________________________________

  16. Love this property! I have lots of “Wildes” ancestors buried there!

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