C. F. Hays & Son General Store, Musella

C F Hays & Sons General Store Musella GA Crawford County Landmark Working Gas Pumps Authentic Country Store Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2014

I first photographed this store in February 2010 and am just as fascinated by it today as I was then. It’s been in business since 1900 and the grandson of the original owner is still operating it today. He has a real passion for the family business and its place in the history of the peach packing town of Musella.

C F Hays & Sons General Store Musella GA Crawford County Landmark Opened in 1900 Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2014

So many times I see modern “country stores” that aren’t worth their salt, but this one is authentic, as the photos below illustrate. Mr. Hays, who has another job besides this one, painstakingly stocks the store with staples and various sundries and country store memorabilia authentic to the store’s history. Some would call it a hobby but I see it as an important link to the past.

C F Hays & Sons General Store Musella GA Crawford County Landmark Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2014

C F Hays & Sons General Store Musella GA Crawford County Landmark Coca Cola Mural Antique Signs Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2014

C F Hays & Sons General Store Musella GA Crawford County Landmark Country Store Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2014

It’s a miracle places like this still exist. Please take the time to stop by if you find yourself anywhere near Musella. Buy an ice cold Nu-Grape or Coca-Cola in a bottle, or have some ice cream from the chest freezer.

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19 Comments

Filed under --CRAWFORD COUNTY GA--, Musella GA

19 responses to “C. F. Hays & Son General Store, Musella

  1. Patty Wise Noble

    I remember Sunday drives as a girl. Daddy would ask, “Who wants a belly wash?” Those were his words as we headed to one of many country stores that dotted the then outskirts of Jacksonville, Florida. We would head into the little store, and I can still smell the scent of the air in there. We would head the the red Coke chest for a drink. For me, it was a peach Nehi, and peanuts or cookie planks. I need to go to Musella. I want a bellywash!

  2. My grandmother lives near Musella in Mauk and her mother was a Hays (Fannie Lee Cindy Hayes, daughter of Lambert (L. B.) Hays and Nancy Jane (Janie) Pike. I wouldn’t be surprised if there was some connection. I’ve never visited Musella but now I most definitely will. Plus, I love me an authentic country store!! Thanks, Brian. I love this site!!

  3. barbara handy

    Mr. Brown, I would like to say that I enjoy your photo and short history of the place you shoot very much. I look at them almost daily, since I have them sent to my email.

    Also, this is my favorite so far. I really enjoy the old churches with their history attached as well. Keep it up! You do a fantastic job. Barbara

  4. Cheryl Luckie

    I spent many days visiting one of my best friends, Shelley Hayes, in Musella. Her family was always so gracious. Loved the people and the sites in this quaint place.

    • Hey Cheryl, if you’re Johnny Luckie’s wife from Ga Southern, we have a mutual cousin in David Luckie. I am the pastor of Musella Baptist Church across the highway from Dickey Farms and next door to Hays General Store. This is a GREAT community with wonderful people.
      Joe

  5. Mercer

    Literally brought tears to my eyes to see this old country store still alive and well. Bless you!!!!!

  6. Kasey Brady

    love it great nostalgia!

  7. Gene Maason

    I don”t want to tell my age, but I remember stores just like this in Fitzgerald. In fact, Owen Segraves and others like Johnny’s Grocery and Garrisons had stores just like this one. A great place to buy a big cookie and a Coke.
    they were the forerunner of the fast stop stores we have today.

    • ben dooley

      I remember them too. They were all over the place in North GA well into the 50’s and 60’s. I’ll bet most of the ones you remember in South GA had “Punch Boards” too. I actually remember one in Clermont, GA with an unforgettable name…”I. P. Rainwater and Sons Grocery”…hope Brian doesn’t have to censor that!

  8. heavenlyjane

    Brian, a nice addition to your posts would be a link to map showing these great places that are so worth visiting.

  9. ben dooley

    I am fascinated by this town’s name… Musella. It so nicely rolls off the tongue. It’s one of those words that is fun to say. I was not aware of Musella until this series of posts Brian. Could anyone out there tell us how the name came to be?

    • Ben, Musella was named for an older couple – His name was Moses and her name was Ella. When it was hand-written and sent to Atlanta (the capital), the writer didn’t enclose the O and it looked like a U, so instead of the community being “Mosella,” it became “Musella!” That’s similar to Fort Valley, GA. I understand that it was originally known as Fox Valley, but someone’s penmanship wasn’t up to speed, so Fox looked like Fort. Gotta love those old stories.
      Joe

  10. Peggy Anderson

    Nostalgic. So many of those little neighborhood stores have closed, it is a real privilege to see one still in operation. Next time I am down that way I do intend to stop by. Thanks for sharing. Your photographs always make my day.

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