Mount Olive Mud Creek Primtive Baptist Church, Lanier County

Mount Olive Mud Creek Primitive Baptist Church Henderson Still GA Lanier County Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia 2014 USA 200

Mount Olive Mud Creek Primitive Baptist Church is one of the oldest and most historic congregations in Lanier County. The church has the traditional appearance of other Hardshell Primitive Baptist meeting houses in Southeast Georgia, except for the white painted walls.

Mount Olive Mud Creek Primitive Baptist Church Lanier County GA Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2014

And like most of the Hardshell Primitives in this section of Georgia, there is no indoor plumbing, hence the fancy “outhouse”.

Mount Olive Mud Creek Primitive Baptist Church Lanier County GA Outhouse Privy Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South georgia USA 2010

Mud Creek Cemetery

Mount Olive Mud Creek Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery Lanier County GA Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2014

Many area pioneers and Confederate Veterans are buried in its cemetery.

Mount Olive Mud Creek Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery Lanier County GA Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia SA 2014

Perhaps the most interesting headstone in the cemetery is this one. I’ve seen some unusual headstones in the hundreds of cemeteries I’ve explored over the past decade, but this has to be among the most unique.

Mount Olive Mud Creek Cemetery Lanier County GA Wrench Shaped Headstone Lester Mack Fender Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2014

In sharp contrast is this unadorned wooden grave marker, one of several that have survived in this sandy burial ground.

Mount Olive Mud Creek Cemetery Lanier County GA Wooden Grave Marker Footprints in the Sand Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2014

Quite a few have common 19th-century themes, such as this dove.

Mount Olive Mud Creek Cemetery Lanier County GA Dove Headstone 19th Century Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2014

And of course, there are numerous Confederate veterans buried here. This one marks the final resting place of Iron Cross recipient Sergeant William B. Corbett (1835-1863), Company G, 50th Georgia Infantry.

Mount Olive Mud Creek Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery Confederate Iron Cross Sergeant William B Corbett Co G 50 Ga Inf Photogaph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2014

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5 Comments

Filed under --LANIER COUNTY GA--

5 responses to “Mount Olive Mud Creek Primtive Baptist Church, Lanier County

  1. there seem to be more than the usual amount of baby and children’s graves in this cemetery. It’s a sad place

  2. Jesse M. Bookhardt

    Brian,
    You presented a nice picture of CSA soldier William Corbbitt’s grave stone at Mud Creek Church. As indicated, he served with the Wiregrass– 50th Georgia Volunteer Infantry during the Civil War. In 1862, the organizer and first commander of that organization was Colonel William R. Manning of the Georgia Militia, Coffee County. His home place was about a mile from our house in which my parents lived for nearly 37 years. He was the son of Laurence Manning and Martha Ashley Manning, pioneers of the area. They built their home near the Ocmulgee River circa 1820s-30s in original Telfair County that then span both north and south of the great Ocmulgee river. In 1854 the Telfair lands south of the river were made into Coffee County, and then in 1905 a portion of Coffee’s first land district became the western half of Jeff Davis County. The Manning place was located near the Coffee line in what is today Jeff Davis.
    Colonel Manning married into the Ashley family (his mother’s family). The pioneer home was a rather pretentious house for Wiregrass pioneers. It was still in existence when I was a child and was called the old Pace House. In about 1860, the Ashleys and Mannings sold most of their holdings and moved near Valdosta, Georgia. The Pace family soon held the old Martha/Laurence Manning home where they operated a turpentine still and timber operation. On our family trips to the Old River, we often viewed the house as we passed. It was located not far from the Ashley/Manning family cemetery, which is one of the oldest cemeteries of the Ocmulgee River frontier region. It is in this family burial grounds that rest the remains of these families, their slaves, and one son of riverboat Captain William Taylor who died as result of a boiler explosion on March 12th, 1860.
    The boat “S. M. Manning” out of Hawkinsville was steaming toward Hawkinsville with a load of merchandise from Savannah and transporting several citizens of Telfair when the explosion happened. Several were killed, both planters and slaves. One of Captain William Taylor’s sons, 19 year old Jefferson, was blown upon the river bank and killed. The Steamer blew its boiler near W. R. Manning’s Lower Fence near Cypress Nursery and First Tub Lake(Flat tub). It is no doubt that Jefferson Taylor was taken to the Manning plantation and prepared for burial in the family cemetery. The old house and cemetery were situated along the Tallahassee Stage trail that penetrated deep into South Georgia. The Northeastern part of the old trail crossed the Altamaha River at Town Bluff and from there made connections to Savannah.
    The 50th Georgia was made up of units from the South Georgia Wiregrass country. They fought in Virginia mostly. Their descendants can still be found all over South Georgia.
    Jesse M. Bookhardt

  3. Jesse M. Bookhardt

    Brian,
    Many creeks in Georgia are named “Mud” Creek. Were they named that because they ran muddy or because Native Americans used special mud(clay) from them to make pottery?

  4. I like the “FENDER wrench”. Maybe it was his occupation, most unusual…

  5. brendaseabrooke

    Sent from my iPhone

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