McCall Farmhouse, Tattnall County

Leta Mac Stripling Farmily Dogtrot Farm House Tattnall County GA Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

This was the birthplace and childhood home of the late centenarian, Leta Mac (McCall) Stripling. It’s located on her descendants’ farmland near the Altamaha community and is soon to be restored.

Dogtrot Breezeway Tattnall County GA Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015 B

From the front porch a view down the partly open breezeway, or dogtrot, leads to the rear kitchen, seen below.

Dogtrot Farm House Tattnall County GA Kitchen Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015 B

An ancient fig tree grows wild beside the kitchen.

Tattnall County GA Dogtrot Fig Tree Kitchen Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

The bedrooms were quite spacious to accommodate large families. The original mantel remains in one, but is absent from another.

Tattnall County Dogtrot Leta Mac McCall Stripling Property Interior Fireplace Mantel Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

Dogtrot Farmhouse Tattnall County GA Leta McCall Stripling Home Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

The small room seen below, at the front corner of the house, was probably used for storing vegetables or other essential items, though I’m unsure of its purpose. It’s much smaller than the two bedrooms.

Dogtrot Farmhouse Altamaha Tattnall County GA Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

This is one of the most unmodified dogtrots I’ve seen and I’m grateful to the Stanleys for allowing me access.

Tattnall County Dogtrot Side View Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

6 Comments

Filed under --TATTNALL COUNTY GA--, Altamaha GA

6 responses to “McCall Farmhouse, Tattnall County

  1. Jimmie Batchelor

    Had to look at this over and over. I loved being there! Wish I could see in person.

  2. suzy

    I love all your posts!! This one is great and I hope it will not only get restored but that you will be able to post pic’s when it is done.

  3. Jesse M. Bookhardt

    Brian,
    I love the old dogtrot framed and/or logged houses. They had character and a unique antique smell that emanated from their unpainted heart pine boards and logs. Years ago when we would go fishing at Flat Tub Landing(First Tub Lake) near the Jeff Davis/Coffee line, there stood an old dogtrot. In its front yard wagon ruts from the historic Tallahassee Trail were still visible. The fabulous old structure proudly stood just west of the Flat Tub Road to the Ocmulgee River. The Tallahassee Trail wagon ruts ran from East to West.
    The smell of the old place was interesting, but the most striking thing to me was its coolness. Standing in the hall(dogtrot) one could almost always feel a breeze, even during the hottest days of July and August. If one had any imagination at all, he could visualize a stagecoach pulling up in front of that old house with horses snorting and dust rolling. Passengers would have likely bailed their hard seats and gathered at a well to enjoy a chance to stand and to drink some cool South Georgia water from a gourd dipper that was passed around the group.
    I saw several dogtrots back then in Jeff Davis, Coffee and Telfair Counties that today have vanished into decay. Only our memories can resurrect these jewels. The few that are left certainly need to be preserved as history lessons about a way of life that now belongs to the ages.
    Brian you do us all a decent service when you share these pictures. Keep up the good work. You deserve recognition as an outstanding educator.

  4. Brian…these photos are beautiful! (as are all of yours!) But this one really speaks through the frame.

  5. ODIS HUDSON

    very nice Brian, i really enjoy your photos!

  6. H.A. Hurley

    Brian ~ I always look forward to and enjoy your photographs of our beautiful state. Thank you for preserving a part of our history which drew me to GA 40 years ago. Thank you

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s