Wiley Washington Baxter House, 1870s, Tattnall County

Tattnall County GA Vernacular Farmhouse Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

I’ve photographed this house many times; it’s an iconic vernacular style, popular in the late 19th and early 20th centuries throughout the rural south. This one retains its original kitchen (later enclosed) but as you can see from the side view, the whole structure is in dire condition. I was delighted to finally learn more about it from Hilda Baxter Tootle: This house was built around 1870 or 1880. My father, the 10th child, was born on Nov 3, 1904. My grandfather, Wiley Washington Baxter built it. Married Pauline Sikes and had 11 children. The house was given to my father, Lathen Leland Baxter, the youngest son. He married Gussie Brannen Baxter. They had 3 daughters. Etwinda Baxter Rogers, Twins, Wilda Baxter Fields and Hilda Baxter Tootle. The house was later sold and you see what happened to it. The house had a master bedroom, living room, 3 more bedrooms, dining room, kitchen and a pantry. A long porch enclosed.

Tattnall County GA Vernacular Farmhouse Baxter Durrence Road Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

9 Comments

Filed under --TATTNALL COUNTY GA--

9 responses to “Wiley Washington Baxter House, 1870s, Tattnall County

  1. Hilda Baxter Tootle

    If you are interested I know the history of this house. It was my home.

  2. Hilda Baxter

    This house was built around 1870 or 1880. My father the 10 child was born on Nov 3, 1904. My grandfather, Wiley Washington Baxter built it. Married Pauline Sikes and had 11 children. The house was given to my father, Lathen Leland Baxter, the youngest son. He married Gussie Brannen Baxter. They had 3 daughters. Etwinda Baxter Rogers, Twins, Wilda Baxter Fields and Hilda Baxter Tootle. The house was later sold and you see what happen to it. The house had a master bedroom, living room, 3 more bedrooms, dining room, kitchen and a pantry. A long porch unclosed.

  3. Wendell Theus

    Hi Brian, Great photos of this iconic old house. I have driven by it many times going fishing or hunting on Big Hammock WMA at Lanes Bridge . It looked like some people were living there about 3-4 yrs. ago. Would be really great if someone would take the time/money to restore this rapidly deteriorating wooden house of which this is a prime example of our previous ancestors lifestyle. Keep up the great work. thanks——– wendell

  4. barbara wetherington

    love your pictures, tracking where you have been.

  5. Gail McNaughton

    Some one PLEASE save this house .

  6. Paul Wetherington

    Hi Brian,
    Looking at the end view the main part of the house seems to have enough height to have had a second floor but there appears to be no sign of ever having upper windows. The main house looks a little like a one room deep plantation plain type. Its really nice that it still seems to be in its original form. I really enjoy following your posts.
    Paul

  7. Are viewers no longer permitted to save your pictures?

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