Burkett’s Ferry Landing, Ocmulgee River

Burketts Ferry Landing Ocmulgee River Jeff Davis County GA Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

The site of a historic ferry on the Ocmulgee, this landing now provides public access to the river. It’s truly one of the most appealing areas on the river, just upstream from the confluence with the Oconee and the beginning of the Altamaha River.

Burketts Ferry Landing Jeff Davis County Ocmulgee River Water Trail Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

Rock outcrops common to the Altamaha Formation are found here as they are in other parts of the county.

Rock Outcrops on the Ocmulgee River at Burketts Ferry Landing Jeff Davis County GA Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

Jesse M. Bookhardt recently shared this about Burkett’s Ferry: Burkett’s Ferry is a wonderful place and occupies a special place in my memory. Located in Jeff Davis County just off the old Pioneer Tallahassee Trail, it represents one of several ferries that provided river crossing services. Though not in operation during my time, I remember the site well. Folks from the neighboring communities such as Snipesville often went there fishing, boating, and picnicking. There existed a small spring of cool clear water that seeped from a bank just up stream from the landing. From this pool of fresh water, many fishermen and visitors to the river stopped to drink. It is unknown to me whether the spring still runs or has succumbed to the dynamic forces of nature. Burkett’s Ferry was one of two closely geographically connect fishing spots. Nearby is Pike Creek recorded as Pipe Creek in the original land survey of the area. Both places provided rich fishing waters. Perhaps the “Pipe” referred to a site for making Native American tobacco medicine pipes. Obviously Native Americans once occupied the Burkett’s Ferry site, for in the 1950s when I was a kid, I found pottery and stone artifacts. During the pioneer period, the ferry connected Telfair with Ocmulgeeville, and further to the east Holmesville, the county seat of Appling. When the original plan was made for the old Macon and Brunswick Railroad, it called for the route to cross the Ocmulgee near Burkett’s Ferry. Later the plan was changed and the railroad was scheduled to be built across the Ocmulgee at Lumber City further down stream. Burkett’s Ferry is historically significant to the Ocmulgee and Wiregrass region for it provided much needed access to the hinterland of South Georgia.

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4 Comments

Filed under --JEFF DAVIS COUNTY GA--

4 responses to “Burkett’s Ferry Landing, Ocmulgee River

  1. Jesse M. Bookhardt

    Brian,
    Burkett’s Ferry is a wonderful place and occupies a special place in my memory. Located in Jeff Davis County just off the old Pioneer Tallahassee Trail, it represents one of several ferries that provided river crossing services. Though not in operation during my time, I remember the site well. Folks from the neighboring communities such as Snipesville often went there fishing, boating, and picnicking. There existed a small spring of cool clear water that seeped from a bank just up stream from the landing. From this pool of fresh water, many fishermen and visitors to the river stopped to drink. It is unknown to me whether the spring still runs or has succumbed to the dynamic forces of nature. Burkett’s Ferry was one of two closely geographically connect fishing spots. Nearby is Pike Creek recorded as Pipe Creek in the original land survey of the area. Both places provided rich fishing waters. Perhaps the “Pipe” referred to a site for making Native American tobacco medicine pipes.
    Obviously Native Americans once occupied the Burkett’s Ferry site, for in the 1950s when I was a kid, I found pottery and stone artifacts. During the pioneer period, the ferry connected Telfair with Ocmulgeeville, and further to the east Holmesville, the county seat of Appling.
    When the original plan was made for the old Macon and Brunswick Railroad, it called for the route to cross the Ocmulgee near Burkett’s Ferry. Later the plan was changed and the railroad was scheduled to be built across the Ocmulgee at Lumber City further down stream.
    Burkett’s Ferry is historically significant to the Ocmulgee and Wiregrass region for it provided much needed access to the hinterland of South Georgia.

  2. J. S.

    Beautiful! May progress, growth, and economic development never
    touch it.

  3. William Davis

    I remember hunting hogs with a bow all up in there as a teenager, beautiful country!

  4. Paul H. Wetherington

    Brian,
    These are great pictures of the Ocmulgee and for me made even more so because you were able to find rock outcropping there. These Altamaha Formation rocks are somewhat fragile and probably represent the oldest “Vanishing South Georgia” items in our natural landscape. Thank you for recording a photographic record of the many things that are special to so many of us.
    Paul Wetherington

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