19th-Century Farmhouse, Lexsy

Lexsy GA Emanuel County 19th Century Farmhouse Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2016

I can’t find any information about Lexsy, but it was a small crossroads settlement at one time, with at least one general store. It had a post office from 1899-1967. This house was likely the largest in the area.

Lexsy GA Emanuel County Farmhouse Interior Blue Walls Fireplace Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2016

The plank walls are in relatively good shape; mantles have been removed from the fireplaces.

Lexsy GA Emanuel County Abandoned Farmhouse Interior Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2016

A shingle roof, likely added in the last 30 years to replace the tin or shake original, is probably the only reason the house is still standing.

Lexsy GA Emanuel County Abandoned Farmhouse Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2016

Jones Hooks writes: My grandparents lived in Lexsy. One of the General Stores was operated by Elsie Hooks – it was an old wooden store with a potbelly wood stove in the center. It burned and was replaced by the brick building that you have pictured. I’m not certain about the wood exterior that was added to the building and when that came about. Another store across the road was run by Mr. Willie May. I remember there was at least one more store located on the east side of Highway 1, but I’m not certain who ran that store. At one time there was a cotton gin in Lexsy and my Grandfather was involved in that gin. There was a school for black students in Lexsy too. My Grandfather was a Primitive Baptist Elder and preached at New Hope Primitive Baptist Church outside of Lexsy. And, yes, there was a telephone exchange located in Lexsy.

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8 Comments

Filed under --EMANUEL COUNTY GA--, Lexsy GA

8 responses to “19th-Century Farmhouse, Lexsy

  1. William Willis

    There was always a Sunday morning marble tournament going on.

  2. Jones Hooks

    My grandparents lived in Lexsy. One of the General Stores was operated by Elsie Hooks – it was an old wooden store with a potbelly wood stove in the center. It burned and was replaced by the brick building that you have pictured. I’m not certain about the wood exterior that was added to the building and when that came about. Another store across the road was run by Mr. Willie May. I remember there was at least one more store located on the east side of Highway 1, but I’m not certain who ran that store. At one time there was a cotton gin in Lexsy and my Grandfather was involved in that gin. There was a school for black students in Lexsy too. My Grandfather was a Primitive Baptist Elder and preached at New Hope Primitive Baptist Church outside of Lexsy. And, yes, there was a telephone exchange located in Lexsy.

  3. Beau

    I know exactly where this house is, and it sits right on a busy road. Beautiful home!

  4. Amy

    Swoon! This is beautiful! I wish I knew better on where its located. We are looking for land with an old farmhouse that needs tons of love but most are way too small for our large family. This one seems big enough! Can you give me a location, please?

  5. K. Morales

    My mother was born in Lexsy. She said there were actually four stores in Lexsy. A Mr. Amerson owned one, Mr. Hooks owned one which was more of a gas station and store. There was another Mr. Hooks that owned a store that was also a gas station but sold more sundry type items. She didn’t remember the owner of the fourth store.

  6. Edna Williamson

    I have no information on Lexsy, but I remember that my grandparents who lived between Vidalia, Soperton and Swainsboro, had a phone number that was a Lexsy exchange.

  7. vanne hanisch-godoy

    I like this old place. It evokes a lot of feelings and memories.

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