Deepstep Road, Washington County

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Besides being one of the prettiest drives in this part of Georgia, Deepstep Road, which is situated near the Fall Line, allows the traveler to see where the Coastal Plain ends and the Piedmont begins.

8 Comments

Filed under --WASHINGTON COUNTY GA--

8 responses to “Deepstep Road, Washington County

  1. heavenlyjane

    Here’s a dramatic representation of the Fall Line near Vidette, Burke County, GA. The ancient shoreline is quite striking. https://www.google.com/maps/search/Savannah+River+Rapids,+ga/@33.0174623,-82.2246891,12.5z/data=!5m1!1e4

  2. HeavenlyJane

    Good stuff. Thanks.

  3. Dale E. Reddick

    Here’s an aerial view of the Fall Line at the Savannah River Rapids, courtesy of Wikipedia. As can be seen, there are multiple steps of small falls or rapids situated along the river.

  4. Dale E. Reddick

    The Fall Line can most easily be seen in places like the Savannah River Rapids, between Augusta and North Augusta. That is literally the site of the falls which mark the passage of the river over & across the Fall Line. That area can be viewed from portions of the Augusta Levee and other spots which access views of the river, or via kayaking down the river through the rapids. There are several points where you can put into the river above and below I-20 and you can recover at the Augusta Marina boat ramp below the Gordon Highway bridge (US 1, US 25, US 78, & US 278).

  5. vanne hanisch-godo

    Very nice view !!!

  6. heavenlyjane

    I’ve long been fascinated by the mythic Fall Line. I know it exists but I haven’t actually ever seen it. Is there a place where one can see a dramatic transition?

    • Jesse M. Bookhardt

      I am sure that there are many places where one can observe features of the Fall Line. Many years ago I hunted quail in Houston County and often found sea fossils such as sand dollars, petrified oysters, and many different kinds of marine shells. According to what I have read, the line is a meandering boundary that at some places is as much as 20 miles wide. In Georgia, it runs from Augusta on the Savannah River, across central Georgia to Milledgeville on the Oconee, and past Macon on the Ocmulgee to Columbus on the Chattahoochee. The line represents the farthermost advance north of the current Atlantic Ocean about 65 to perhaps 200 million years ago. The Fall Line is marked by a significant drop in altitude of the land. The Earth north of this line has mainly clay based soils, and South has mostly sandy soils.
      During the early years of our history, All along the Easter Seaboard, Fall Line water power stimulated manufacturing. Thus, cities grew along this demarcation. In Alabama, Montgomery is a Fall Line city, and in South Carolina, Columbia sits on the Fall Line.
      The Fall Line has historically had a significant influence on the development of Georgia and other states. Since north of the Line, the rivers were rocky, narrow and fast moving, the adjoining land areas were denied steamboat travel but had available vast water power to run mills, etc. Georgia is fortunate to have a variety of geographical land regions. The Upper and Lower Costal Plains include wide river valleys, sandy soils, swamps, and remnant Longleaf Pine flats and sand ridges. In the Piedmont just above the Upper Coastal Plains, the soil is red clay and the rocks much older than the Coastal Plain. And of course, South Georgia is blessed to have the modern day Atlantic Ocean which provides a wide variety of economic energy and vast recreational opportunities. As Georgians, we have an obligation to wisely use and preserve our natural resources, and our culture. We must learn to appreciate what we have before we can truly protect that which we have.

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