Round Barn, Laurens County

Round Barn, Laurens County, Georgia, 1974 © David Frey

I was so excited to receive this image from David Frey of an historic round barn in Laurens County; he was gracious enough to let me share it. He made the photograph in 1974, noting that it was a landmark to travelers between Dublin and Wrightsville in those days; the barn is still standing but no longer accessible to the public. As a result, I’m unable to share an exact location. This example is of the octagonal variety and though I have no idea as to a date, my best estimate would be 1900-1910.

A brief review of available references on the subject suggests this may be the only surviving round barn in Georgia; a 14-sided example, the Dorough Round Barn at Hickory Level in Carroll County is listed on the National Register of Historic Places but is apparently in ruins or no longer extant.

 

 

 

 

 

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6 Comments

Filed under --LAURENS COUNTY GA--

6 responses to “Round Barn, Laurens County

  1. Nancy

    I believe I know where this is located. I will check it out this weekend. If it’s the same one it has dilapidated a lot since this picture was taken.. Wish someone would have taken care of this Round Barn.

  2. Interesting..thanks for posting

  3. Wendell Theus

    HI BRIAN, I SEE WHAT YOU WERE TALKING ABOUT WITH THE ROUND BARN. NOW THAT IS A REAL PIECE OF CRAFTMANSHIP FOR THE TIME AND THERE TOOL SUPPLY!!! WOULD BE FAIRLY DIFFICULT TO TRY AND REPLICATE TODAY!! HOPE THEY TAKE GOOD CARE OF–THESE TYPE STRUCTURES ARE DISAPPEARING WAY TOO FAST.
    KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK.
    WENDELL

  4. vanne hanisch-godo

    something about this picture I really like!!

  5. Raleighwood Dawg

    That’s a beauty! Is the round/octagon shape for functionality or aesthetics? Would love to know more. Thanks for posting, Brian.

    • What I’ve read suggests they were a result of a growing focus on efficiency in the mid-19th century…greater volume to surface ratio and cheaper to build. True “round” barns are rare but Indiana has quite a few. The Shakers also built them. Most other examples are less realized and come in multiple polygonal forms. 8-, 12-, 14-, even 18-sided.

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