Brewton-Hendrix House House, Circa 1858, Evans County

Oral tradition suggests that this Plantation Plain farmhouse was built for Jonathan Bacon Brewton (1827-1897) by Amos Hearn, the builder of the nearby A. D. Eason House. Brewton was the son of one of the area’s earliest settlers, Benjamin Brewton, who came to Tattnall County (now Evans) in 1794 from Warren County. He married Margaret Everett in 1848 and one of their sons, John Carter Brewton, was a co-founder and the first president of Brewton-Parker College.

Jonathan served as Clerk of the Superior Court of Tattnall County and two terms in the Georgia House of Representatives . From late 1862 until early 1864 he was active in the 5th Georgia Cavalry but returned before war’s end upon his  election as clerk of the court. In 1865 a foraging party of Union troops passed through the area and ransacked the house. After the war, Brewton continued his enterprises and also operated a general store and post office.  The community around the house and store was known as Haw Pond at the time. Brewton also owned a gristmill, lumber mill and cotton gin. Brewton’s heirs sold the house to one of their former sharecroppers, James A. Hendrix, in 1936. The Willcox family has owned it since 1990.

Source: Pharris DeLoach Johnson,  Houses of Heart Pine: A Survey of the Antebellum Architecture of Evans County, Georgia.

 

 

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3 Comments

Filed under --EVANS COUNTY GA--

3 responses to “Brewton-Hendrix House House, Circa 1858, Evans County

  1. Marshall Brewton

    Beautiful photo. I’ve enjoyed seeing this house during previous visits to Evans County. One correction to the story: Jonathan Bacon Brewton was the son of Benjamin Brewton (my great great grandfather), and the grandson of (not the son of) Nathan Brewton.

  2. John Rabun

    Thank you for this photograph of my great-grandparents’ house. Obviously, the cupola was added in recent years. Originally, there was a rather stately chimney at each end of the house.

  3. I’ve viewed many, many of your photographs, and this is one of the most striking I have seen. One can look at this photograph and almost put themselves sitting on that front porch, listening to the birds and katydids, while enjoying a cool glass of sweet southern tea. Keep up all of your hard work in capturing these views. They are enjoyed by many of us, even if we don’t often take the time to let you know how much we appreciate your labors.

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