Mount Pleasant, Circa 1830, Effingham County

This home was built by John Gindrat Morel (1808-1871) and surely took its name from the nearby Uchee Indian settlement and English trading post known as Mt. Pleasant, on a high bluff of the Savannah River. One of Georgia’s earliest forts was located at Mt. Pleasant, under the command of Captain Thomas Wiggin, an Indian trader. Morel was a relative of Pierre Morel, whose descendants owned Ossabaw Island for more than a century, beginning in 1760. He was married to Elizabeth Kennedy, a great-granddaughter of John Adam Treutlen (1733-1782), Georgia’s first popularly elected governor. Thanks to Kenneth Dixon for background and genealogical information.

2 Comments

Filed under --EFFINGHAM COUNTY GA--

2 responses to “Mount Pleasant, Circa 1830, Effingham County

  1. Jesse Bookhardt

    Beautiful picture of the house framed by a wonderful Live Oak. These oaks are special treasures of Georgia. Long recognized and celebrated by poets, laymen, and visitors, we are correct to name this tree our State Tree. Her historical importance is widely known as the tree that the young U.S. Navy cherished as an ideal wood for ship building. Her many forks and turns, her strong fibers, and her resistances to booming cannon balls made her so well thought of until she was used on an early Navy Ship, the USS Constitution. It is said that cannon balls would bounce off her sides.This old vessel of the early nineteenth century era is still commissioned as a Navy ship. Her timbers and other essential parts are reported to have come from Georgia Sea Island Live Oaks. We ought to be proud.

  2. Pingback: Mount Pleasant, Circa 1830, Effingham County — | EffinghamMoves

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