Southern Railway Swing Bridge, Lumber City

Here’s a different view of one of my favorite places. Most folks just call it the Lumber City bridge, or the Lumber City trestle, but it’s an amazing survivor and no doubt a landmark for many travelers. It’s still in use.

6 Comments

Filed under --TELFAIR COUNTY GA--, Lumber City GA

6 responses to “Southern Railway Swing Bridge, Lumber City

  1. Inez Adams

    As always, very beautiful!

  2. gajoe42

    Brian,

    I just got word that my short story “Going Home on the Nancy Hanks has won the Fleming Literary Competition. I can’t publish until after the formal awards but do have a railroad story on my blog. I worked in the mail sheds of the Atlanta Terminal in 1959-1961 and it was a great experience.I certainly miss the engineering, romance and excitement of riding the train. I get on a jet liner without even seeing the outside of the plain and every body vanishes when they are seated in their own little cacoon. There are no passing cities and towns, no country side to see, and and above the clouds the weather hardly changes. Joe at longleafjournal.com

    • Congratulations on the Porter Fleming Award, Joe. Very excited for you! I’ve been enjoying your posts on Longleaf Journal. I think my father recently subscribed, or plans to.

  3. Rafe Semmes

    Hello, Brian,

    I have not seen this bridge in person, but I have a wonderful color print of it, made by a photographer named Emory Moody, a now-retired nuclear engineer out of Waynesboro, GA, 20 miles south of Augusta. He and his wife split their time out of Darien, GA, where he volunteers at the Darien “Old Jail” Art Museum. He is also a frequent exhibitor at the annual “Art in the Park” event held in historic Vernon Square. one block north of the Darien waterfront. That event is held coincidental to the “Blessing of the Fleet” Festival in April.

    I enjoy your photos. The latticed windows on the “Calaboose” building from Leary, GA, does make it look like it was perhaps used as a jail.

    Rafe Semmes Midway, GA

  4. John Coleman

    How can I send pictures? My family grew up in Twin City and I have pictures you might like. I would love to share them.

    John Norris Coleman 909 630 4603

    >

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