Sanders-Spann-Bryson House, 1836, Webster County

This Plantation Plain farmhouse, built circa 1836, is the oldest in Webster County. Typical of the transitional architecture of the time, it retains a strong Federal influence. It is an amazing treasure that has only survived because of good stewardship.

The house is best known today as the Spann-Bryson House. I’m indebted to Debbie Walker for her assistance in tracking down the history. She spoke with owner Mike Connor, and he his wife Ann have done an amazing job maintaining this venerable landmark. Mr. Connor noted that it was built by a Mr. Sanders and was identified in the Webster County history book as the Old Sanders Place.

5 Comments

Filed under --WEBSTER COUNTY GA--

5 responses to “Sanders-Spann-Bryson House, 1836, Webster County

  1. Art Redding

    Awesome Brian!

  2. Carol

    At least up here in my historic neighborhood in Nashville, earliest houses had entrances to the outside from all the rooms. My house originally did on both the main floor and lower level (where the kitchen was originally–it made sense, for ventilation. Later additions changed the pattern, so one of the front rooms was closed off when the upstairs was finished off and stairs to the attic were added. Old houses reflect changes over time.
    Those screen doors are to die for!

  3. ben dooley

    I also wonder about what appears to be the extra doors into the 2 front rooms from the porch. If there was only one I would surmise if allowed access to a ”preacher’s” room but 2 is a puzzle.

    • ben dooley

      OOPS, my 2 comments are reversed from the intended order…Great example Brian. Many Plain Style houses were originally without a full front porch with the porch being a later addition. In this case the high sills and small windows on the upper level indicates the porch is original with the columns are a salute to the Greek Revival style which was becoming ”fashionable” in the 1830’s.

  4. loyd B dooley

    Beautiful example Brian. Many Plain Style houses were originally built without a porch with a porch being added later. The high sills and small windows on the upper floor seem to indicate this porch was probably there from the beginning with the columns being a salute to the Greek Revival style which was becoming ”fashionable” in the 1830’s.

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