Woodrow Amos Store, Jarrell

I believe the Amos and Jarrell families were related. This store is just up the road from the iconic Jarrell’s Grocery.

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Filed under --TAYLOR COUNTY GA--, Jarrell GA

Amos Farm Tenant House, Jarrell

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Filed under --TAYLOR COUNTY GA--, Jarrell GA

Central Hallway Cottage, Mauk

The transom and sidelights surrounding the front door suggest that this is a relatively early central hallway form. The dormer on the left may be a later addition.

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Filed under --TAYLOR COUNTY GA--, Mauk GA

Mauk School, 1936, Taylor County

This historic Mauk School was built by the Works Progress Administration in 1936 to replace a smaller schoolhouse that had served the the community for a number of years. The architect is unknown, but the school is almost identical to “Floor Plan No. 5 – Five Teacher Community School” from the Rosenwald Fund. The school appears to be well-maintained today.

National Register of Historic Places

 

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Filed under --TAYLOR COUNTY GA--, Mauk GA

Mauk United Methodist Church, Taylor County

Typical of Georgia’s rural churches, Mauk United Methodist derives its beauty from the simplicity of its construction. I haven’t been able to locate any history of the church.

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Filed under --TAYLOR COUNTY GA--, Mauk GA

Rupert Post Office, Taylor County

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Single-Pen Tenant House, Taylor County

This single-pen house is located north of Rupert.

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Tenant Farmhouses, Houston County

This row of four surviving tenant houses in southern Houston County is an important landmark of the sharecropping era. Interestingly, three different designs are represented among them. On the largest working farms, tenant houses were often located adjacent to one another in rows. Very few examples of this configuration survive today. And while it’s obvious that these won’t be around much longer, I admire the landowners who have kept them as reminders of the history. These likely date to the early 20th century.

The first two pictured are simple saddlebags.

This board-and-batten example is larger than the others and has chimneys on each end.

My favorite of the four was this hip-roofed saddlebag with false-brick siding. In the South, we generally refer to this type of siding as “tar paper”.

 

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Filed under --HOUSTON COUNTY GA--

Elijah Paulk House, 1895, Willacoochee

This Willacoochee landmark is a familiar sight to anyone who has traveled through the town on US Highway 82. It was built by Coffee County pioneer Elijah “Lige” Paulk (1867-1896) for his bride, Laura Corbitt,  in 1895. [Willacoochee was still in Coffee County at the time]. Sadly, Mr. Paulk died the next year. The 31 January 1896 edition of the Douglas Breeze notes in his obituary: Mr. Paulk was about twenty eight years old, and had been married only about three months to Miss Laura Corbett of this county. Although he was young in years he, by correct business methods and close application, had accumulated a nice property, and his home in Willacoochee was one of the best in the county…

Veryl & Lucille Boatright bought the house in 1948 and it remains in their family.

Thanks to Kim Jones for sharing this with Loretta Goff McCranie and Betty Boatwright who filled in the blanks on the history. Some of the information is included in a publication by the Southeast Georgia Area Planning and Development Commission entitled An Inventory of Historical Sites in the Southeast Georgia Area. Its authors note that the house originally had a double veranda, and it retained its wainscoted ceilings and walls, a stained glass transom over the front door, and that that pressed tin roof was original.

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Filed under --ATKINSON COUNTY GA--, Willacoochee GA

Brown Grist Mill, Yonker

This little building at Yonker is what remains of the Brown Grist Mill. Thanks to Frank Brown for the identification.

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Filed under --DODGE COUNTY GA--, Yonker GA