Tag Archives: Antebellum South Georgia

Harris-Ramsey-Norris House, Circa 1860, Quitman

This Greek Revival cottage is said to be the oldest house in Quitman.

Quitman Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --BROOKS COUNTY GA--, Quitman GA

Bethlehem Primitive Baptist Church, Circa 1861, Brooks County

Bethlehem Primitive Baptist church was established in 1834 as the Baptist Church at Christ Bethlehem, just two years after the Primitive sect was formed nationally from a  split with the Missionary Baptists. They formally affiliated with the Primitive Baptists in 1840.

The present church, constructed circa 1861, is one of the few remaining antebellum structures surviving in Brooks County.

To those familiar with the Crawfordite Primitve Baptists of Southeast Georgia, it will look quite familiar, as it is plain, unpainted, and contains multiple entrances.

The congregation disbanded in 1964, had a brief revival between 1981-1984, and has been inactive ever since.

It’s a serene place that will hopefully be preserved far into the future.

National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --BROOKS COUNTY GA--

Ephraim Ponder House, 1856, Thomasville

Built for Ephraim G. Ponder, a slave trader, this house originally featured a square cupola at the center of the roof. Ponder enslaved the Flipper family and one of their children, Henry Ossian Flipper (1856-1940), was the first black cadet to be admitted to the United States Military Academy at West Point, in 1877.

Detail of albumen cabinet card of Lieutenant Henry Flipper by Kennedy of Wilberforce, Ohio, circa 1877.  Courtesy U.S. House of Representatives. Committee on Military Affairs. Public domain.

Flipper earned a commission as a second lieutenant in the U. S. Army. He was also the first black officer to lead the buffalo soldiers of the 10th Cavalry. He went on to serve in the Apache Wars and Victorio’s War but was troubled by rumors that led to his eventual court martial and discharge. He continued to work for the United States, as an assistant to the Secretary of the Interior in Mexico and Central America. Flipper’s family sought and received a complete pardon in 1999. It’s a nice irony that the slave trader is largely forgotten today while Mr. Flipper is honored with an annual award in his name at West Point.

Dawson Street Residential Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --THOMAS COUNTY GA--, Thomasville GA

Seixas House, Circa 1835, Thomasville

The Seixas [pronounced say-shus] family were among the early settlers of Thomasville and this house, now an office, is the oldest one-story house in Thomasville. It was moved to this location by Thomasville Landmarks to prevent demolition.

Dawson Street Residential Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

 

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Antebellum Cottage, 1850s, Thomasville

This circa 1853-1855 cottage has recently been renovated. The dormer is a later addition that detracts from its Greek Revival appearance.

Fletcherville Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --THOMAS COUNTY GA--, Thomasville GA

Wright House, 1854, Thomasville

This fine antebellum home was designed and built by John Wind in the Fletcherville neighborhood for Arthur P. Wright, a banker a city alderman who served as Thomasville mayor at the outset of the Civil War. It was used for early meetings of the St. Thomas Episcopal Church, as well.

The hand-carved square columns are perhaps the most significant decorative elements of the house, which is listed individually and as a contributing property to the Fletcherville Historic District in the National Register of Historic Places.

National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --THOMAS COUNTY GA--, Thomasville GA

Miller House, Circa 1858, Thomasville

This is one of three important antebellum houses in the Tockwotton neighborhood. The Georgia historical marker placed in the neighborhood reads: Thomas County was created in 1825 and Thomasville established as county seat in 1826. Early settlers from Rhode Island are credited with naming this area for the Tockwotton Indian Tribe which inhabited Rhode Island at the time of its colonization. Development began during the antebellum period and the city limits of Thomasville were expanded to include Tockwotton in 1857. In the 1880s and 1890s wealthy Thomasville residents and winter visitors from the north began building large houses along South Hansell Street and Remington Avenue. By 1910, the area had taken on its present appearance characterized by informal front yards, flower plants and tree-lined streets the create a park-like setting. By the 1970s the neighborhood had deteriorated and was threatened by commercial development. In 1971, Thomasville Landmarks, Inc, a private, non-profit preservation group led by its president Marguerite Neel Williams thwarted the redevelopment of this area. The Tockwotton-Love Place Historic District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984.

Tockwotton-Love Place Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --THOMAS COUNTY GA--, Thomasville GA