Tag Archives: –EARLY COUNTY GA–

Unidentified Commercial Building, Jakin

jakin ga general store photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2016

My guess is that this served as a commissary or general store but it could have been a feed warehouse or something agricultural.

 

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Mosely Building, Circa 1910, Jakin

jakin ga mosely building photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2016

The right side of this building served as the Mosely Drug Company from 1910-1927. I presume the remainder was a general store, judging by the sign.

jakin ga o h mosely sign photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2016

 

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Jakin Library & Museum

jakin ga llibrary museum photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2016

This was likely a general store at one time.

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Filling Station, Jakin

jakin ga filling station photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2016

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Bank of Jakin, 1912

bank of jakin ga photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2016

This served as Jakin’s only bank when nearly 2000 people called the area home during the lumber boom of the early 20th century. The charter for the bank was granted to Elisha Hilton. From 1923 to 1988, it served as the post office and today is in use as the city hall.

National Register of Historic Places

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Abandoned House, Hilton

hilton ga abandoned house photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2016

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Kolomoki Mounds, 350-750 AD, Early County

kolomoki mounds national historic landmark temple mound photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2016

Located along Kolomoki Creek, a tributary of the nearby Chattahoochee River, Kolomoki Mounds is among the largest Woodland Period burial and temple complexes in the Southeast.  The site dates to 350-750AD/CE and may have been one of the most populous settlements north of Mexico at the time. Most of the mounds are quite small in contrast to the Temple Mound (seen above), which has a base of 325 by 200 feet and a height of 56 feet. It is believed that the Temple Mound was used for religious ceremonies and there is speculation that the chieftain’s house was located on the west side (seen below) of the mound, which is slightly higher than the east side.

kolomoki mounds early county ga temple mound photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2016

Various tribes made this site home, including Weeden Island, Kolomoki, and Lamar Indians.

kolomoki mounds ga view from atop temple mound photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2016

This view, from atop the Temple Mound, looks out onto a vast plaza. This was a typical layout for Woodland villages. The plaza would have included various houses of wattle and daub construction, roofed with local grasses. In its time, all of this would have been exposed red clay.

kolomoki mounds temple mound stairs photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2016

Looking down the steps to the plaza gives some perspective as to the size of the temple mound.

kolomoki mounds national historic landmark photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2016

This burial mound, on the plaza, is known simply as Mound D. At 20 feet, it’s one of the largest extant Woodland burial mounds. It was completely excavated in the early 1950s; radiocarbon dating has suggested it was built around 30AD/CE, with a margin of error of 300 years. More information about the site’s smaller mounds and a history of archaeological excavations conducted here over the years can be found at the New Georgia Encyclopedia. Sadly, a theft at the site in 1974 resulted in the loss of numerous pieces of pottery and other artifacts. It’s hoped that an inventory of the stolen items, which are still sought by the park, will eventually lead to some of them being recovered.

kolomoki mounds state historic park gopher tortoise photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2016

There is much to see at Kolomoki Mounds State Park, including abundant wildlife and flora. This Gopher Tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus), covered in red clay, was crossing the main road in the park. They were likely quite abundant here in the Woodland Period.

National Historic Landmark

 

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Historic Commercial Architecture, Blakely

blakely ga court square historic storefronts photograph copiyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2010

Blakely has done a nice job of preserving and maintaining the historic storefronts surrounding the courthouse. Two of the highlights are seen at right. The Blakely Theatre (1936) has been restored for use as a performing arts space. Unlike most small-town theatres, which were built in the Art Deco style, the Blakely was built with Colonial Revival features. The Alexander Building (1904) is an unusually well-preserved turn-of-the-century commercial block which has recently been restored.

Blakely Court Square Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Houston Coin Laundry, Damascus

damascus-ga-houston-coin-laundry-photograph-copyright-brian-brown-vanishing-south-georgia-usa-2016

At the other end of Main Street is the Houston Coin Laundry and another derelict storefront.

damascus ga laundry window painting photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2016

The window paintings are a nice feature.

damascus ga laundry photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2016

 

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Main Street Storefronts, Damascus

damascus ga main street storefronts photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2016

Most of these storefronts are in ruins and will soon be gone. The building on the far right was Brady’s Food Basket, the local grocery store.

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