Tag Archives: –EFFINGHAM COUNTY GA–

Williams House, Clyo

Alice DeForest writes: This house belongs to Cary Williams, Sr., and Ann Ford. It was built by their great-grandfather and has been in their family a very long time…Their father, Joseph Williams, Sr., was born and raised in the home. Joe Jr. and Cary were born there also. Their grandmother Emma Williams taught school in Clyo and roomed many teachers there…

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Georgian Cottage, Clyo

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Central Hallway House, Clyo

This house is a nice example of a very common vernacular form, seen less and less today.

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Savannah River, Effingham County

The Savannah River was one of Georgia’s original “superhighways” long before Europeans made contact. The river marks the state line between Georgia and South Carolina over much of its course; this is the view from the Highway 119 bridge near Clyo.

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Tuckasee King Landing, Effingham County

The outpost of Tuckasee King, near present-day Clyo, was the first seat of Effingham County (1784-1787). It was named for a Euchee chief who lived in the area. Today, it’s best known as a landing on the Savannah River.

 

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Mizpah United Methodist Church, 1859, Effingham County

From the South Georgia Conference of the United Methodist Church: In the late 1850s, Dr. Ayer from Rome came to the community to visit his daughter, Mrs. Anderson P. Longstreet, who lived in the community. There was no Methodist church in the area at this time and so Dr. Ayer contributed financially to funding a church. Lewis Grovenstein, Benjamin C. Porter, and A. P. Longstreet was selected to organize the new sanctuary and four acres were selected from property owned by George W. Best. The new structure was a frame building measuring thirty-five feet by fifty feet by thirteen feet and was completed in December 1859. On March 18, 1860, the church was organized with twenty females and twenty males on the roll. This church was served by two pastors, Rev. B. F. Breedlove and Rev. L. L. Strange. The first quarterly conference was held in September 1866, under the pastorate of Rev. N. D. Morehouse. In 1885, money was collected to “remodel, repair and paint” the church and, in 1886, the roof was extended in the front and pews were built…In August 1945, electricity was installed at Mizpah… Also in the 1940s, the inside of the sanctuary was remodeled so that the separate entrances and seating for men and women were changed to one double door and one center aisle. In 1953, the wood burning stove was replaced with a gas heater…

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Mount Pleasant, Circa 1830, Effingham County

This home was built by John Gindrat Morel (1808-1871) and surely took its name from the nearby Uchee Indian settlement and English trading post known as Mt. Pleasant, on a high bluff of the Savannah River. One of Georgia’s earliest forts was located at Mt. Pleasant, under the command of Captain Thomas Wiggin, an Indian trader. Morel was a relative of Pierre Morel, whose descendants owned Ossabaw Island for more than a century, beginning in 1760. He was married to Elizabeth Kennedy, a great-granddaughter of John Adam Treutlen (1733-1782), Georgia’s first popularly elected governor. Thanks to Kenneth Dixon for background and genealogical information.

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Mingledorff Farmhouse, Circa 1855, Effingham County

I’m grateful to Kenneth Dixon for sharing the history of this home: The Mingledorff Farmhouse was built in 1858 by Norman Mingledorff (1830-1864). “DG 1858” is carved into a brick near the top of the chimney, the initials most likely being those of Georgia Ann Dasher, Norman’s wife. The house has stayed in the Mingledorff family since it was built, and a descendant of Norman and Georgia is slowly trying to restore the house.

Dan Frawley writes: Norman was our great-great grandfather… we have been told through the family that the house was built in 1855. Also told that when a chimney was added back in the day, it was customary for the brick mason to add his initials and the year of completion …

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New Hope A. M. E. Church, 1885, Guyton

Celebrating its sesquicentennial this year, New Hope A. M. E. Church was founded by former slaves on 4 August 1869. It’s the oldest black church in Guyton and among the oldest A. M. E. congregations in Southeast Georgia. The original members, mostly the families of carpenters, farmers, turpentiners, and millers, had been members of Methodist churches and sought to build a congregation and community. The neighborhood came to be known as Sugar Hill.

I had the good fortune  of meeting Mrs. Pearl Powell Boynes, who graciously invited me inside the church with my camera. She was a delightful lady who has a background in history and great reverence for her ancestors’ contributions to New Hope. The above photo of her great-grandparents, George (born 1828) and Eve McCall, graces the vestibule of the church.

Reverend W. H. Wells was the first pastor. The church was built with rough-hewn lumber joined with wood pegs and square nails. Originally, the exterior was covered with hand-carved shingles and the walls made of hog-hair and cement plaster. Some of the shingles remain on the exterior. The chandelier in the middle of the sanctuary has been a prominent feature since around the turn of the century. It was originally gas-powered.

The hand-carved pews have been in use since the church was completed.

National Register of Historic Places

 

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Colonel Edward Bird House, 1870, Guyton

Colonel Edward Bird (1825-1893) was a successful timber and turpentine operator before the Civil War. He joined Company A, Squadron B, Georgia Cavalry, as Captain. It was nicknamed Captain Bird’s Mounted Company, 2nd Battalion, Georgia Cavalry. Captain Bird was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel on 17 May 1862 and took command of the 2nd Battalion. He transferred to the 5th Regiment, Georgia Cavalry on 20 January 1863 and was promoted to Colonel in 1864. He commanded the 5th Battalion until surrendering at Greensboro, North Carolina on 26 April 1865. After the war, Colonel Bird resumed his business and remained a prominent citizen of Guyton until his death.

Guyton Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

 

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Filed under --EFFINGHAM COUNTY GA--, Guyton GA