Tag Archives: Endangered Places in South Georgia

Queen Anne Folk Victorian Farmhouse, Washington County

I’m honored to be able to share this photograph by Anne Chamlee; it will be one of several I plan on publishing here and on Vanishing North Georgia. Earlier this year, Anne reached out to let me know that she appreciated the work I was doing documenting Georgia’s rural architecture and that she had some photographs of her own that I might enjoy seeing. After several back-and-forth emails and some phone conversations, I’m so glad we were able to make a connection. She’s just as intrigued by the architecture of rural Georgia as I am and by the late 1980s was wandering around the backroads of Middle Georgia, photographing the endangered examples that sparked her interest. She’s also a delightful conversationalist, which is a bit of vanishing thing itself these days.

A Sooner by birth, Anne came South with her family just as the Dust Bowl was coming to an end. They wound up in Florida and she eventually met and married a man with roots in Hancock County, Tilmon Chamlee. Tilmon was a rising architect who had a very successful career in the commercial sector. After many years in Florida and then Macon, Anne and Tilmon eventually settled at Lake Sinclair in Baldwin County, where he continued his practice and indulged in his love for flying. He was also a commercial and instrument-rated pilot. Tilmon passed away in 2015 but Anne remains active in the community. After talking with her on the phone a few times, I still cannot believe she’s 85.

Regarding the house: It was located near Warthen, and is believed to be no longer extant. The photo dates to January 1989. It is of particular interest, as there is a very similar example nearby. The ornamental middle “gable”, as best I can tell, is a localized vernacular interpretation of the Queen Anne style. It’s possible they were the work of the same builder.

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Filed under --WASHINGTON COUNTY GA--

Central Hallway House, Circa 1890, Howard

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Filed under --TAYLOR COUNTY GA--, Howard GA

Saddlebag Georgian Cottage, Jeffersonville

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Filed under --TWIGGS COUNTY GA--, Jeffersonville GA

Gable Front Farmhouse & Shed Barn, Twiggs County

This utilitarian shed/barn is located on the same property as this circa 1930 bungalow.

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Filed under --TWIGGS COUNTY GA--

Log Farmhouse, Twiggs County

This log farmhouse includes an attached kitchen, with siding likely added later. Window placement on the house suggests a remodel at some point.

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Filed under --TWIGGS COUNTY GA--

Single-Pen Log Farmhouse, Circa 1890, Twiggs County

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Filed under --TWIGGS COUNTY GA--

Tenant Farmhouse, Twiggs County

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Filed under --TWIGGS COUNTY GA--

Tenant Farmhouses, Snow Spring

Two tenant houses from an historic farm remain on this property, though both are nearly gone. There were likely more such houses here at one time. They are great examples of a once common but increasingly rare vernacular form.

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Filed under --DOOLY COUNTY GA--, Snow Spring GA

Capron, Georgia

I first thought this are to be a community known as Jalappa, since the road is named Jalappa and a list of U. S. post offices makes reference to a post office at Jalappa from 1851-1855. Further research is required on Jalappa. However, as to the places seen here, Sammy Lester writes:  This is my family home. It was a plantation at one time. The mail came from Montezuma by horseback. The name is Capron. My Grandfather named the post office after the first officer that fell going up San Juan Hill with Teddy Roosevelt. Once there was a cotton gin, grist mill, a shingle mill and blacksmith shop along with the general store. The wooden building (above) is the original store and you can still see the mail slot. Capron circa 1898!

The brick storefront (below) dates to 1910, and most of the structure is gone.

 

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Filed under --DOOLY COUNTY GA--, Capron GA

Findlay, Georgia

Other than the fact that a post office known as Findlay operated here from 1889-1905, I’ve not been able to track down more information about this lost community. Today, the only visible reminder of its past is this abandoned commercial structure, likely a general store, built by A. C. Bullinton in 1914. A large agribusiness operation, Finley Gin Company, dominates the area today. Of course, there are variations in the spelling of the settlement’s name.

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Filed under --DOOLY COUNTY GA--, Findlay GA