Tag Archives: Georgia Institutional Architecture

Restoration of the Kinlaw Rosenwald School, Camden County

Marshall Glover

While photographing in Camden County with Cynthia Jennings yesterday, I met Mr. Marshall Glover. Mr. Glover is leading the work of restoring the historic Kinlaw Rosenwald School, which was built in 1921. The formal education of African-American children in Kinlaw began in a one-room schoolhouse built on the site in 1896.

The African-American community of Kinlaw was very progressive and embraced better education for its children. Upon learning of the existence of the Rosenwald grants from Matilda Harris, Camden County’s supervisor of black schools, the people of Kinlaw began exploring the possibility of replacing their schoolhouse with a better facility. They raised $909 and with matching contributions and grants began construction on this structure in 1920, with the first classes beginning in 1921. The school offered instruction for children from first to seventh grade and was one of three Rosenwald facilities in the county. Kinlaw is the only one that survives today.

Mr. Glover told me that his father and grandfather both attended the school and that he was glad to be doing the restoration as a way of honoring them. He noted that he has been working for over a year and spent much of that time caulking the tongue-and-groove paneling. He pointed out that the excellent material and construction of the school has been evident during the restoration, with much of the work being cosmetic. He stated that there were some parts of the floor that were compromised due to leaks in the old roof, but they are getting to that work now. With a team of volunteers, he has done an excellent job.

Please consider a contribution to continue this important work. Secure donations can be made here.

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Filed under --CAMDEN COUNTY GA--, Kinlaw GA

63rd AAF Flying Training Detachment Airbase, 1941, Douglas

Administration Building

Through the efforts of Wesley Newman Raymond and Robert Richardson, the Raymond-Richardson Aviation School was established at this site in 1939, to teach basic flight skills to college students.

WWII Flight Training Museum [Barracks 7]

With America’s entrance into World War II in 1941, the school became the 63rd Flight Training Detachment Airbase.

Barracks

During the war, several thousand men learned to fly here and went on to serve all over the world.

Barracks

Many local women provided support as clerical and food service employees, as well as civilian dispatchers and aircraft mechanics.

Classroom

The based was decommissioned in 1944 and the hangers have been incorporated into the old airfield, now known as Douglas Municpal Airport (KDHQ).

Hospital

The property, now owned by the city of Douglas, has been used for numerous purposes since the end of the war.

Gatehouse

Through the efforts of local enthusiasts, Barracks 7 is now home to the WWII Flight Training Museum, which has limited hours. The property can be accessed at any time.

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Filed under --COFFEE COUNTY GA--, Douglas GA

Friendship Schoolhouse, 1850s, Sumter County

The only reference I can locate regarding this structure is from the old Friendship Baptist Church minute book. It was noted on 23 January 1864 that the schoolhouse and adjacent five acres were purchased by the congregation for $500. Considering the church was built in 1857, it is possible that the schoolhouse predates it. The portico is obviously a later addition.

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Filed under --SUMTER COUNTY GA--

Liberty Methodist Church, Marion County

I first identified this historic structure, south of Mauk, as a schoolhouse, largely due to the fact that it still has traces of red paint. But George Woodall, who grew up in Mauk, relates that it was Liberty Methodist Church. It’s definitely endangered and will likely not survive much longer without intervention.

 

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Filed under --MARION COUNTY GA--

Mauk School, 1936, Taylor County

This historic Mauk School was built by the Works Progress Administration in 1936 to replace a smaller schoolhouse that had served the the community for a number of years. The architect is unknown, but the school is almost identical to “Floor Plan No. 5 – Five Teacher Community School” from the Rosenwald Fund. The school appears to be well-maintained today.

National Register of Historic Places

 

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Filed under --TAYLOR COUNTY GA--, Mauk GA

Oliver School, Screven County

Photo Courtesy John Aubrey Brown

I’m so excited to be able to share this photograph, which was shared by John Brown. He made the shot circa 1995. It’s the old Oliver School and was lost to fire a few years after the photograph was made.

Oliver was one of about 40 white schools in Screven County surveyed by M. L. Duggan for the Georgia Department of Education in 1916. The steeple or bell tower was a design element present only in the larger schools of the county, including Capitola, Douglas Branch, Gilgal, Harmony, Rocky Ford, and Sylvania. At the time of the survey, W. S. Brown was teacher and principal, and Miss Fannie Ryon was his assistant. There were 10 grades and 62 students, with a 32-week school year. The school was valued at $3000 and was noted to be in very good condition.

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Filed under --SCREVEN COUNTY GA--, Oliver GA

Brantley County Courthouse, 1930, Nahunta

When Brantley County was created in 1920, Hoboken was chosen as the seat of government. After two contested elections voters chose Nahunta to be the new county seat and it was officially recognized as such in 1923. Since this structure, designed by Waycross architect Thomas Jefferson Darling (1868-1943), wasn’t completed until 1930, I presume the courthouse in Hoboken remained in use during the interim.

National Register of Historic Places

 

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Filed under --BRANTLEY COUNTY GA--, Nahunta GA

Chester High School, 1929, Dodge County

Donny Screws writes: This is the original Chester High School, built in 1927. Rebuilt in 1929 after a tornado outbreak damaged the foundation. Many people graduated from Chester High, and when Dodge County built a consolidated High School, it became Chester Elementary School in the late 50s. I went to school there and taught there my first year, as did my wife. I have posted extensively on Chester Elementary and there is also a Chester Elementary School Page on Facebook. There are a thousand great stories to tell from that great School. Looking at that picture, every room has a fascinating history. I have tons of photos also. Good photo here. Holler if anyone wants more information.

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Filed under --DODGE COUNTY GA--

Gaskins School, 1900s, Weber

The two-room Gaskins School is located in the Weber community. Bryan Shaw of the Berrien County Historical Society notes that it was built prior to 1908. After consolidation, a larger building was constructed adjacent to this schoolhouse and it was used as the lunchroom.

Shaw also states that the consolidated school was moved off the property when it closed, and was remodeled by Sheriff Walter Gaskins for use as his home.

 

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Filed under --BERRIEN COUNTY GA--, Weber GA

Willacoochee Elementary School, 1924

I’ve always admired this unusually large wooden structure and until recently knew nothing of its history. It has been in an advanced state of decline for many years.

Harvey Williams notes that it was the elementary school (segregated) and later a coat factory, owned by Sheila Gaskins. It’s a very large school for such a small town, and may have served more grades when it was first built.

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Filed under --ATKINSON COUNTY GA--, Willacoochee GA