Tag Archives: Georgia Pioneers

Nevils Creek Old Line Primitive Baptist Church, Bulloch County

Nevils Creek is the oldest church in Bulloch County and one of the oldest Primitive Baptist churches in Georgia. It was constituted in 1790. A single headstone is located beside the church: John Neville served in the 2nd South Carolina Regiment during the Revolutionary War. He may have been the founder of the congregation.

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Union United Methodist Church, 1884, Bulloch County

In 1790, a Methodist society that became Union church was organized in the home of Joshua Hodges, Sr. Hodges was a Revolutionary War veteran who had recently moved his family, including four sons, to the area. Members of the Methodist society set aside a tract of land west of the Hodges house, known on early land records as “Meeting House Reserve” and a log meeting house was constructed by 1792. The trustees were Joshua Hodges, Sr., Joseph Jackson, Jarvis Jackson, Catherine Hodges, Griffin Mizell, and Samuel Williams.

In 1834, the second church was built to replace the log structure. It was built of planks and sat on log pillars. It was replaced by the present structure in 1884, incorporating materials from its predecessor in the altar rails and some of the pews. The altar rail was crafted by Robert W. Stringer.

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Campground United Methodist Church, 1942, Bacon County

Historic Campground Methodist Church Bacon County GA Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

Situated in a grove of old Georgia pines, Campground is the oldest congregation in Bacon County and one of the earliest Methodist churches in the interior of South Georgia. Legend maintains that Bishop Asbury, “Prophet of the Long Road”, hitched his horse here around 1800. A granite marker placed in 1942 is the source of this information. That’s likely the date the present church was constructed. L. E. Pierce was the pastor at the time.

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Walker-Peters-Langdon House, 1828, Columbus

Historic Columbus GA Walkers Peters Langdon House Early Prefabricated Architecture Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

Prefab housing of the 19th century? This house was built for Colonel Virgil H. Walker by Nathaniel Peters and is believed to have been fabricated offsite, then constructed at this location. Thought to be the oldest house in the original city limits of Columbus, it was likely a town house for Colonel Walker’s large family, who were prominent landowners in neighboring Harris County. Colonel Walker sold the house and lot in 1836 to Mrs. Dicey Peters. In 1849, Mrs. Peter’s daughter Frances, who had married Will Langdon, obtained the house. Members of the Langdon family occupied the house for over a hundred years. Today, the property is owned by the Historic Columbus Foundation. It’s open for tours, but only by appointment.

National Register of Historic Places

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Wynn House, 1839, Columbus

Columbus GA Robert Wynn House Oakview Antebellum Mansion Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

When Colonel William Wynn built this stately mansion, it was called Oakview. Colonel Wynn, for whom the Wynnton area of Columbus is named, was an early settler of the Lower Chattahoochee Valley. Henry Hurt bought the house in 1852 but never lived in it, selling it to Hines Holt in 1855. Holt was a prominent attorney, as well as a member of t he U. S. House of Representatives.  In 1905, Tom Cooper purchased the house and moved it closer to Wynnton Road so the property could be subdivided for other development. In 1932 the S. C. Butler family bought and completely restored the house. The Christian Fellowship Association moved into this landmark in 1958. Today it’s operated as a membership-oriented event and entertainment space.


National Register of Historic Places

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John Teel House, Circa 1840, Sumter County

John Teel House Antebellum Greek Revival Landmark Gaston Farm Sumter County GA Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

This vernacular Greek Revival house is the centerpiece of what is today known as the Teel-Crawford-Gaston Plantation or, more practically, the Gaston farm. The historical background that follows (in italics) comes from the 2004 National Register of Historic Places registration form. The farm represents two major periods in the history of Georgia agriculture, the plantation system and the the tenant farming system. John Teel purchased the property in 1836 and built the main house by 1840. He established a plantation where, by 1850, he lived with his wife, nine children, and 16 slaves. In 1852, Teel sold the plantation to Shadrack and Lucina Crawford, who after the Civil War turned the property from a plantation based on slave labor to a farm based on the tenant system.

John Teel House Sumter County GA Antebellum Landmark Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

The Crawfords sold the farm to Robert B. Gaston in 1918, who farmed there until his death in 1925. Gaston worked the land with mules and relied on the labor of tenant farmers. Gaston built the existing outbuilding complex to support the operation, most of which survives. James Monroe Gaston, Jr., Robert’s grandson, continues to farm the property to this day.

Gaston Farm Georgia Centennial Farm Sumter County GA Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

National Register of Historic Places

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Hendley Foxworth Horne House, 1853, Long County

Horne House Long County GA Plantation Plain Converted to French Colonial Influence Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

I’ve photographed this house dozens of times over the last six years and recently learned that it is being deconstructed and the lumber salvaged for use in a new structure. The longtime owners of this landmark spent many years maintaining it and without their commitment to its history, it would have been long gone by now. I’m grateful for being allowed unlimited access to photograph and document it in its final days.

Horne Farm House 1850s Long County GA Plantation Plain Converted French Colonial Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

I believe the house originated as a Plantation Plain, or I-House, the common vernacular style of wealthier farmers and planters in 19th-century Georgia. The porches were likely a later addition, giving it its present French Colonial appearance.

Horne House Long County GA Foyer Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

The first floor foyer is dominated by a narrow stairwell. To the right of the stairs is a re-paneled bedroom. One of the two main rooms downstairs would have originally served as a parlor and the other may have been a bedroom or dining room.

Horne Farmhouse Long County GA Remodeled Room Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

A “modern” kitchen is evidence that this home has served many generations, though the appliances and design attest to how long it’s been empty.

Horne Farm House Long County GA Modern Kitchen Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

The  upstairs bedrooms are largely unchanged.

Horne Farm House 1850s Long County GA Upstairs Bedroom Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

As closets were not in use in the mid-19th-century, this one, with a simple closure,  was added later.

Horne Farm House Long County GA Closet Door Latch Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

The mantels are being removed and will be reused. The bricks in the fireplaces were made locally and are one of the best indicators of the age of the house.

Horne Farm House 1850s Long County GA Upstairs Bedroom Fireplace Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

In one bedroom, some of the wall boards have already been removed, revealing the beautiful rough-hewn local lumber that frames the house.

Horne Farm House Antebellum Plantatrion Old and New Walls Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

The second floor foyer is brightened by sidelights, replicating the appearance of the main entryway.

Horne Farm House Antebellum Long County GA Upstairs Landing Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

The foyer leads to a porch with louvered ends to maximize air circulation.

Horne Farm House Long County GA Antebellum Architecture Second Floor Porch Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

Horne Farm House 1850s Long County GA Louvers Second Floor Porch Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

When the house is viewed from the rear, it seems possible that the hallway at the rear of the second floor was once a breezeway, especially when considering the larger windows in the middle.

Horne Farm House Back Yard Long County GA Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

Here’s the hallway.

Horne Farm House Long County GA Upstairs Hallway Breezeway Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

It appears to be wasted space in the present form, and people in mid-19th-century rural Georgia didn’t waste space. Still, it’s a nice feature today. More of the original rough-hewn walls have been exposed by the deconstruction.

Horne Farm House Antebellum Long County GA Upstairs Hallway Rough Hewn Wall Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

There are small rear corner rooms on each end of the second floor.

Horne House Long County GA Upstairs Spare Room Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

Corner posts are reinforced by buttresses and wooden pegs.

Horne Farm House Long County GARough Hewn Frame Buttresses Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

Here’s the view from the top of the landing back down to the first floor entryway.

Horne Farm House Long County GA View Down Stairs to Foyer Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

And here’s a view of the roof of the kitchen/packhouse addition.

Horne Farm House Plantation Long County GA Kitchen Roof From Upstairs Bed room Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

And another rear view of the house, showing the size of the kitchen/packhouse.

Horne Farm House Long County GA Antebellum Plantation Rear View Showing Kitchen Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

Unlike most detached kitchens which have been connected to a main house, this one only has outside access. The original kitchen is really a complex of three rooms. The first section likely served as a dining and storage area.

Horne Farm House Long County GA Kitchen Pantry Jars Photogaph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

The second room was where the work of the kitchen was done, featuring a large hearth.

Horne Farm House Long County GA Kitchen Hearth Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

A small room at the end of the complex was likely used as a packhouse/root cellar.

Horne Farm House Plantation Long County GA Root Cellar Room Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

I feel fortunate to have been able to experience this house. It’s a real gem.

Horne Farm House Long County GA Viewed Across Young Pecan Orchard Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

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