Tag Archives: Historic Georgia Farms

Josiah Davis House, 1869, Emanuel County

This well-maintained landmark was built by Confederate veteran Josiah Davis. Davis was a farmer who raised cotton and corn. Upon his death, his widow lived out the rest of her life here. The Peacock family purchased the home after Mrs. Davis’s death.

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Filed under --EMANUEL COUNTY GA--

Meadows & Porter Peach Farm, Bleckley County

The extensive Meadows & Porter Farm [Joe Walker Meadows and Marion Porter] is one of the most intact historic peach farms in Georgia. It is anchored by the Meadows’s Queen Anne farmhouse (above). Most of the dependencies are still standing and in good condition. For its connection to one of Georgia’s most iconic crops, the farm should be listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The commissary is located between the main house and the peach packing shed and is in exceptional condition.

Two tenant houses survive, reflecting different eras in the development of the farm.

This board-and-batten example is likely the earlier of the two.

This is a label from my collection, of Meadows & Porter’s “Rooster Brand” peaches.

The peach packing shed is an amazing example of the form, and peaches are still raised on the farm.

I hope these important structures survive well into the future.

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Filed under --BLECKLEY COUNTY GA--

Queen Ann Farmhouse, Dodge County

This is an interesting vernacular interpretation of the Queen Anne style. The three gables on the north side of the house (above) are an unusual feature.

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Filed under --DODGE COUNTY GA--

Dix House, Wilcox County

This is among the best known and most notable farmhouses in Wilcox County and is the centerpiece of what was once a large working farm. Most of the historic barns and dependencies survive. I have passed it in my travels since childhood and have always admired the dedication of the family to its upkeep. I’ll update with more history soon.

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Filed under --WILCOX COUNTY GA--

Seasonal Peach Workers’ Housing, 1910s, Lee Pope

A sign identifies this amazing survivor as the Lee Pope Hotel, though it was actually housing for Pearson Farms’ seasonal peach workers.

All the structures of the Lee Pope Fruit Farm should be included in the National Register of Historic Places as an important example of a 20th century Georgia peach farm.

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Filed under --CRAWFORD COUNTY GA--, Lee Pope GA

Lee Pope House, Circa 1910

According to the Pearson Farm website, the Lee Pope House came with the farm when the property was purchased by John and Rosa Lee Pearson. They raised their family here.

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Filed under --CRAWFORD COUNTY GA--, Lee Pope GA

Commissary, 1910s, Lee Pope

Around 1910, the Pearson family purchased the tremendous Lee Pope Fruit Farm and its peach packing operation here. It included numerous tenant houses, this commissary, a “hotel” which housed seasonal workers (really a dormitory), a packing house (now gone), and numerous barns and sheds. At one time, the Pearson peaches were branded “Big 6”. The family’s long-term preservation of this property provides an important historic lesson of the importance of the peach industry in this section of Middle Georgia and she be commended.

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Filed under --CRAWFORD COUNTY GA--, Lee Pope GA

Woodland Dependencies, Wheeler County

This impressive stock barn at Woodland (it may have been used as a dairy) is one of the largest of its type in this section of South Georgia. Several other smaller barns are scattered on the property but many have been lost over the years. The other two structures depicted are the most important surviving dependencies; my identifications are educated guesses and if I’m incorrect, I’ll update.

This was likely a commissary or warehouse.

This may have been the plantation schoolhouse. Its architecture suggests that it is somewhat contemporary to the main house.

 

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Filed under --WHEELER COUNTY GA--

Georgian Cottage, Circa 1870s, Dodge County

This house once anchored a farm on the edge of Eastman. It’s in the Georgian Cottage style and typical of middle class farms that began to prosper in the years following the Civil War. While it has not been identified or dated as yet, its architecture indicates it was likely built in the decade following the war.

The ruins of a tobacco barn on the driveway leading to the main house, as well as a tenant houses at the end of a row of pecan trees, indicate that this was an active farm well into the 20th century. It appears to have been abandoned for many years and is located on private property. I’m lucky to have been given the opportunity to document it and am grateful to the owner for granting permission facilitated by David Bray. David was a great host in showing the property, which ultimately the owner would like to see moved and saved. Unfortunately, it may be too far gone.

The wraparound porch is thought to be a later addition.

It features hand-carved porch posts that give it a bit of a Folk Victorian appearance.

The four interior rooms have been “updated” but still retain wainscot chair rails and what are thought to be the original mantels. The mantels reflect a middle class owner, who used spindles to add ornamentation.

The rear of the house is a mirror image of the front.

I hope the house can be moved and saved, but it would need to happen soon. The owner will give it to someone who will move it; if you know someone with a serious interest, please contact me.

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Filed under --DODGE COUNTY GA--, Eastman GA

Georgian Farmhouse, Schley County

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Filed under --SCHLEY COUNTY GA--