Tag Archives: Historic Georgia Farms

Thomas Farmhouse, Decatur County

This is located on an historic Centennial Farm.

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Filed under --DECATUR COUNTY GA--

White Oak Pastures, Early County

Since 1866, five generations of the Harris family have cultivated the land they call White Oak Pastures. Today, it’s the most diversified farm in the South and the gold standard of sustainable agriculture in Georgia. Their grassfed beef and lamb and pastured poultry are sold throughout the Eastern United States. Driving around the Bluffton area, it’s obvious that White Oak Pastures is having a major economic impact on the area.

A little background from the White Oak Pastures’ website:

Will Harris is a fourth generation cattleman, who tends the same land that his great-grandfather settled in 1866. Born and raised at White Oak Pastures, Will left home to attend the University of Georgia’s School of Agriculture, where he was trained in the industrial farming methods that had taken hold after World War II. Will graduated in 1976 and returned to Bluffton where he and his father continued to raise cattle using pesticides, herbicides, hormones and antibiotics. They also fed their herd a high-carbohydrate diet of corn and soy.

These tools did a fantastic job of taking the cost out of the system, but in the mid-1990’s Will became disenchanted with the excesses of these industrialized methods. They had created a monoculture for their cattle, and, as Will says, “nature abhors a monoculture.” In 1995, Will made the audacious decision to return to the farming methods his great-grandfather had used 130 years before.

Since Will has successfully implemented these changes, he has been recognized all over the world as a leader in humane animal husbandry and environmental sustainability…His favorite place in the world to be is out in pastures, where he likes to have a big coffee at sunrise and a 750ml glass of wine at sunset.

 

I knew it was a good sign when I saw Purple Martins (Progne subis) scouting nesting locations at one of the “apartments” near the entrance.

The organic quesadilla I had in the restaurant was literally one of the best I’ve ever eaten. We got there a bit after the normal lunch hour, so we missed the pork chops and sweet potatoes that were on the menu for the day, but this was a great substitute.

I’m glad this is one place and way of life that is not vanishing. Drive a little out of your way and have a meal, stop by the general store in Bluffton, or, if you need to escape the daily grind, spend a night in one of their on-farm accommodations.

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Filed under --EARLY COUNTY GA--

Ingram Homeplace, Circa 1890, Clay County

A marker at the gate indicates the Ingram family began farming this land around 1850.

 

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Filed under --CLAY COUNTY GA--

Sam Engram House, Circa 1913, Zetto

Brothers Dan and Ed Giles, whose family has farmed the surrounding countryside for over fifty years, have transformed this historic home into the Pine Ridge Plantation lodge. They have modernized the space while maintaining its historic integrity and the plantation has quickly become one of the premier hunting destinations in Southwest Georgia. Though sometimes spelled ‘Ingram’, old timers from the area have written that it was spelled ‘Engram’.

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Filed under --CLAY COUNTY GA--, Zetto GA

Allen Jones House, 1885, Candler County

candler-county-ga-allen-jones-house-photograph-copyright-brian-brown-vanishing-south-georgia-usa-2016

This appears to have originally been built as an unusually small Plantation Plain-style farmhouse with the wings likely added as the family grew. The orientation of the house has also been changed, as well, with the entryways now located on what would have originally been the sides.

candler-county-ga-jones-farmhouse-photograph-copyright-brian-brown-vanishing-south-georgia-usa-2016

Across the highway on the farm is this unusual barn, which I initially thought was a smokehouse. But as Edwin King pointed out, smokehouses didn’t have chimneys. I’m not sure if it was originally a smokehouse, with the chimney added later, or if it had some other function. I just can’t place it.

candler-county-ga-jones-farm-photograph-copyright-brian-brown-vanishing-south-georgia-usa-2016

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Filed under --CANDLER COUNTY GA--

Powell Farm, Lanier County

lanier county ga farmstead photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2016

This farmhouse is located just north of Lakeland. It’s an interesting vernacular form which immediately caught my eye as I was driving toward Pearson.

lanier county ga historic vernacular farmhouse photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2016

It’s part of an historic farmstead that is presently listed for sale.

lanier county ga historic farmhouse photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2016

My guess is that it dates to the late-19th or early-20th century.

lanier county ga historic farmstead barn photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2016

Two pack houses or seed barns are located on the property.

lanier county ga historic farmstead packing shed photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2016

A nice tobacco barn also survives.

lanier county farmstead powell road tobacco barn photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2016

Update: Sadly, as of 2019, the farm has been demolished, with not a building left as I understand it.

 

 

 

 

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Filed under --LANIER COUNTY GA--

Jordan Farm, Calhoun County

Calhoun County GA Plantation House Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vansihing South Georgia USA 2016

I’m not sure of the history of this house, but it’s one of the most perfectly classical I’ve yet seen. I’ve been told that it’s known locally as the Jordan Farm. Jimmy Webb writes that it’s now owned by Bob & Barbara McLendon. Barbara McLendon writes: Bob McLendon and I own this house. This farm was purchased in 1950 from a family from Chattanooga by my father, William Harvey Jordan. Prior to it being purchased, the farm was managed by Frank Worthy and they lived in the home. The cemetery is in the field located adjacent to the house. If anyone would like to see this house or visit the cemetery you can call Bob McLendon at (229) 881-3201. It is better to visit the cemetery in the winter months when there is not a crop planted in the field.

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Filed under --CALHOUN COUNTY GA--