Tag Archives: National Register of Historic Places

Central of Georgia Depot, 1895, Leesburg

It’s nice to share a restoration success story from time to time and Leesburg’s historic Central of Georgia Depot fits the bill. There were plans to restore the structure as early as 2002 but storm damage in 2006 and budget issues delayed the project to the point that many believed it would never happen. See it before restoration here. Thanks to the efforts of concerned locals who never gave up on the project, it was beautifully restored and reopened to the public in 2018. It now serves as the Chamber of Commerce and visitor center for the community. It was a recipient of a 2019 Excellence in Rehabilitation Award from the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation.

National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --LEE COUNTY GA--, Leesburg GA

Andersonville National Cemetery

One of fourteen National Cemeteries administered by the National Park Service, Andersonville is still open for burials today. Few places will put into perspective the human cost of war more than the burial place of so many who paid the ultimate price in preserving our national interests and values.

I’ve visited here numerous times during my life and the impact is always the same. I’m awed by the beauty of the place yet saddened by the loss of so many.

The earliest burials at the site were trench graves of those who died at the adjacent prison at Camp Sumter, and these began in February 1864. In little over a year, over 13,000 men were interred here. The earliest graves are those visible when you first enter the cemetery.

After the war, the remains of many prisoners were confirmed and given proper markers.

Andersonville National Cemetery is still open for burials today, and the National Park Service tries to accommodate as many requests as possible. There are no waiting lists, so such a burial can only be arranged after a veteran’s death. Over 20,000 are interred here today.

Andersonville National Historic Landmark

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Filed under --MACON COUNTY GA--, Andersonville GA

Providence Spring House, 1901, Andersonville

Thousands of prisoners were literally dying of thirst when on 14 August 1864 a spring burst forth at this site within the prison stockade at Camp Sumter. Its appearance was providential and it was one of the treasured memories of many veterans who returned to the site in the years following the Civil War. Pilgrimage to the spring was a regular part of Memorial Day activities here by the 1880s.

The prisoner’s cry of thirst rang up to Heaven. God heard, and with his thunder cleft the earth and poured his sweetest waters gushing here. These words are memorialized on a tablet inside the well house marking the site. The construction of the pavilion was a collaboration between the Woman’s Relief Corps and the National Association of Union Ex-Prisoners of War.

The site is among the most popular stops at Andersonville. Just don’t drink the water. Signs indicate it’s contaminated today.

Andersonville National Historic Site

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Filed under --MACON COUNTY GA--, Andersonville GA

William Hardwick Byrom House, 1859, Byromville

Byromville, originally known as Friendship, was a stagecoach stop operated by Thomas Swearington. In 1852, Swearington sold the surrounding land to William Hardwick Byrom. Byrom built a large general store, which included a post office, and the name of the community was changed to honor him, in 1853. It was incorporated in 1905. This landmark Greek Revival Georgian Cottage remained in the Byrom family until 1992 and underwent a certified rehabilitation by the new owners thereafter.

National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --DOOLY COUNTY GA--, Byromville GA

New Hope A. M. E. Church, 1885, Guyton

Celebrating its sesquicentennial this year, New Hope A. M. E. Church was founded by former slaves on 4 August 1869. It’s the oldest black church in Guyton and among the oldest A. M. E. congregations in Southeast Georgia. The original members, mostly the families of carpenters, farmers, turpentiners, and millers, had been members of Methodist churches and sought to build a congregation and community. The neighborhood came to be known as Sugar Hill.

I had the good fortune  of meeting Mrs. Pearl Powell Boynes, who graciously invited me inside the church with my camera. She was a delightful lady who has a background in history and great reverence for her ancestors’ contributions to New Hope. The above photo of her great-grandparents, George (born 1828) and Eve McCall, graces the vestibule of the church.

Reverend W. H. Wells was the first pastor. The church was built with rough-hewn lumber joined with wood pegs and square nails. Originally, the exterior was covered with hand-carved shingles and the walls made of hog-hair and cement plaster. Some of the shingles remain on the exterior. The chandelier in the middle of the sanctuary has been a prominent feature since around the turn of the century. It was originally gas-powered.

The hand-carved pews have been in use since the church was completed.

National Register of Historic Places

 

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Filed under --EFFINGHAM COUNTY GA--, Guyton GA

Colonel Edward Bird House, 1870, Guyton

Colonel Edward Bird (1825-1893) was a successful timber and turpentine operator before the Civil War. He joined Company A, Squadron B, Georgia Cavalry, as Captain. It was nicknamed Captain Bird’s Mounted Company, 2nd Battalion, Georgia Cavalry. Captain Bird was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel on 17 May 1862 and took command of the 2nd Battalion. He transferred to the 5th Regiment, Georgia Cavalry on 20 January 1863 and was promoted to Colonel in 1864. He commanded the 5th Battalion until surrendering at Greensboro, North Carolina on 26 April 1865. After the war, Colonel Bird resumed his business and remained a prominent citizen of Guyton until his death.

Guyton Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

 

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Filed under --EFFINGHAM COUNTY GA--, Guyton GA

Queen Anne House, Circa 1900, Quitman

Quitman Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --BROOKS COUNTY GA--, Quitman GA