Tag Archives: Okefenokee Swamp

Log Corn Crib, Ware County

This is located in the vicinity of the Okefenokee Swamp and is likely quite old. It’s unusual to see a corn crib with a secondary roof, so I was a bit uncertain of the identification. It’s still my best guess, though.

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Filed under --WARE COUNTY GA--

Spreading Pogonia, Ware County

Spreading Pogonia (Pogonia divaricata), also known by the prettier name Rosebud Orchid, is a rare terrestrial orchid found in Charlton and Ware counties in Southeast Georgia (other small populations likely exist). The Okefenokee region is one of the most biologically diverse in the state and spring is a great season to observe its abundant flora.

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Filed under --WARE COUNTY GA--

Hamp Mizell Road, Ware County

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Filed under --WARE COUNTY GA--, Hopkins GA

Swamp Homestead, Ware County

Just around the bend from Suwannee Lake stands this simple house, typical of the utilitarian homesteads of the Okefenokee. It’s likely one of the very last standing. Restored older examples can be found at Okefenokee Swamp Park and Obediah’s Okefenok.

 

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Filed under --WARE COUNTY GA--, Hopkins GA

Hamp Mizell & Suwannee Lake, Ware County

As a boy fascinated by occasional visits to the Okefenokee Swamp, I was in awe of the name Hamp Mizell (1884-1948). Dr. Delma Presley told stories of his legendary two-mile swamp holler in Okefinokee Album [this recording is of another famous swamp family, the Chessers].  Coincidentally, I knew his daughter Montine Mizell Mathhews, whose husband Harold worked with my father on the railroad, but did not know at the time that she was a Mizell. I regret missing the opportunity to talk about her father with her.

It was wonderful to visit Suwannee Lake, on the edge of the great swamp, since it has always been associated with Mr. Mizell. It’s not a big fishing hole, but nonetheless revered by fishermen in the know. Judging from satellite images, I believe it’s an oxbow of Suwannee Creek which runs from the west into the swamp. A. S. McQueen noted in his History of Okefenokee Swamp, 1932: [Mizell] is the owner of the beautiful Suwannee Lake, on the north side of the Okefenokee Swamp, one of the most famous fishing places in Georgia. A record was kept of the fish caught in this lake, and one season, 41,618 fish were caught by the hook and line method. During one day 35 fishermen caught 1,471 fish by actual count.

 

 

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Filed under --WARE COUNTY GA--, Hopkins GA

Wat Hathainares Buddhist Meditation Center, Ware County

On one of the most rural roads in Georgia it is quite a surprise to come upon this fascinating place. Wat Hathainares is a Buddhist meditation center located on the edge of the Okefenokee Swamp. It’s not a cult or a compound, but simply a place of peaceful meditation.

The statuary is quite impressive, and contrary to popular belief, they are not worshiped.

Like all religions and belief systems, Buddhism is not monolithic. Numerous ethnic groups and various sects follow the teachings of the Buddha.

The practitioners at Wat Hathainares are from Thailand.

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Filed under --WARE COUNTY GA--

Seminole Chickee Grave Shelter, Ware County

Chickee is the Seminole word for house, and these iconic shelters are still scattered throughout Florida. To my knowledge, this chickee in the Carter Cemetery is the only such grave shelter in Georgia.

In addition to the construction, the shells marking the graves of George Washington Carter (25 October 1862-4 July 1934) and Millie Louvine Thrift Carter (18 January 1860-30 December 1947) honor a Native American ancestry. Mr. Carter, who was born on Cow House Island, was one of the pioneer settlers of the Okefenokee Swamp. The Thrifts were also early residents of the swamp.

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Filed under --WARE COUNTY GA--

White-tailed Deer, Okefenokee Swamp

okefenokee-swamp-white-tailed-deer-photograph-copyright-brian-brown-vanishing-south-georgia-usa-2011

White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) are abundant in the Okefenokee and the ones I photographed at Stephen C. Foster State Park were nearly tame. Their are signs warning against feeding them, but people apparently do so anyway.

okefenokee-swamp-stephen-c-foster-state-park-photograph-copyright-brian-brown-vanishing-south-georgia-usa-2011

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Filed under --CHARLTON COUNTY GA--

Okefenokee Swamp, Charlton County

okefenokee trail charlton county ga photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2009

The drive on the Okefenokee Trail (Georgia Highway 177) from Fargo to the entrance of Stephen C. Foster State Park will give an indication that you’re about to be in a real wilderness. There isn’t a sign of civilization for miles.

okefenokee swamp ga stephen c foster state park entrance photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2009

Practically tame, White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) can often be seen grazing near the entrance to the state park.

okefenokee swamp ga white tailed deer photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2009

Though the swamp had been in a drought for several years when I made these photographs, search and rescue boats were on hand to illustrate the real dangers of getting lost in the swamp.

okefenokee swamp ga dnr search rescue boats photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2009

The Trembling Earth Nature Trail is the easiest way to see a microcosm of the swamp at the park, though a boat is always best. Fred Deal designed this walkway when he attended Ware Technical school in 1967.

okefenokee swamp boardwalk photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2009

The boardwalk is always well-maintained. It’s a great place to watch birds. I caught a quick glimpse of this Red-shouldered Hawk (Buteo lineatus).

okefenokee swamp ga red shouldered hawk photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2009

The swamp is quite different in the winter, especially in low water.

okefenokee swamp ga cypress stump photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2009

I’ve always found alligators in abundance in the Okefenokee, but didn’t see a single one on this visit.

okefenokee swamp saw palmetto photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 209

Saw Palmetto (Serenoa repens) is ubiquitous. As a native of South Georgia I appreciate its beauty and place in the ecosystem.

okefenokee swamp ga autumn photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2009

 

 

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Filed under --CLINCH COUNTY GA--, Okefenokee Swamp