Tag Archives: South Georgia Farmhouses

Joe Cowart Homeplace, Tattnall County

tattnall-county-ga-farmhouse-photograph-copyright-brian-brown-vanishing-south-georgia-usa-2016Joe Cowart House, 1904

Located just outside Collins, this Folk Victorian house is the centerpiece of what was obviously a busy working farm at one time. Kathryn Braswell Hochman writes: This is my father’s homeplace, known locally as the Joe Cowart Homeplace, and is where we visited my Grandmother Braswell every summer until she died in 1966. It has been rented to tenants ever since. Joseph Lumpkin Cowart (born 1849; died at that house on Christmas Eve 1938 and was buried the next day in a coffin he had made himself) had the house built in 1904 for approx. $80. It was built on the site of a log house (moved off of the property) in which the family had lived. Across the house is indeed a tenant house, and if you were to go behind it you would find a crumbling log tobacco barn. Perhaps you can tell me which is the pack house and which was used for hay. It was not a working farm by the time I came along in the 1950s.. Or rather, only the land was farmed, and by others. I should tell you that this house and the outbuildings and the land are the stuff of my happiest childhood memories. My parents are buried in the Collins Baptist Church Cemetery, and I will always have a reason to go there.

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There are a few outbuildings, including this one, which was a tenant house.

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Barns with utilitarian purposes stand in a row across the highway from the main house.

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I can’t be sure of all their specific uses, but a hay barn and pack house are among them.

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Vernacular Farmhouse, Tattnall County

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Plantation Plain Farmhouse, Tattnall County

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This landmark in northern Tattnall County appears to be in its final days. Thanks to Krista McGukin for bringing it to my attention.

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Gabled-Ell Farmhouse, Evans County

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E. G. M. Fletcher House, 1880s, Irwin County

irwin county ga elbert fletcher house photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2016

If you’ve ever traveled Georgia Highway 125 between Fitzgerald and Tifton, you probably recognize this house, situated slightly west of Irwinville. I’ve been seeing it my entire life and only learned some of  its history today. It was the home of Elbert George McClellan Fletcher (1866-1952), likely built around 1889, when he married his first wife, Mary Jane Elizabeth (Polly) Hobby Fletcher, who died in 1916. Upon Polly’s death, Elbert married Ruth Turner Fletcher (1870-1956) in 1917. The house was built as a dogtrot, and originally contained an annexed kitchen, which has since been removed. It would have been a “fancy” dogtrot compared to the cruder log structures usually associated with the style.

irwin county ga historic fletcher house photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2016

Winston McDuffie shared these memories of the house: Elbert was quite dignified, handle-bar mustache, and walking stick, sitting on the front porch in his rocking chair. I can’t remember him talking much, and Toby and Ruth were together talking so there was not too much for a 5-6 yr old boy to do. There was a fence across the front, the gate had a chain with a weight to pull it closed, and there was a pomegranate bush beside the gate, always a pleasure to pick one. There was a cane-grinding set-up in the right-hand corner (towards Tifton), under the Oak tree. We attended a cane-grinding a couple of times. There was a barn on the left side, back behind the house. I remember Mama and Deal would pick cotton for John (son) all during school. The house had a dog-trot hallway, with 4 doors (2 per side), and opened onto a porch all across the back of the house. There was another dog-trot off the porch to the separate kitchen. The first door on the left was the sitting room, and the other 3 were bed-rooms. Toby and I slept in the one adjacent to the sitting room when we spent the night. There was a full grand-father clock in the room, but I can’t remember what any other furniture was like. No grass in the yard, it was swept clean with gall-berry brooms.

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Abandoned House, Hilton

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Vernacular Farmhouse, Baker County

baker county ga vernacular farmhouse photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2016

This appears to have been built as a double-pen house with a later rear addition.

baker county ga vernacular farmhouse tar paper photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2016

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