Tag Archives: South Georgia Houses

Abandoned Queen Anne House, Washington County

Anne Chamlee photographed this house in March 1991. She believes it was in Washington County but if anyone knows otherwise, please contact me.

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Abandoned Queen Anne House, Washington County

Anne Chamlee photographed this abandoned Queen Anne house, just south of Tennille, in March 1991. I have also photographed a good bit in the area and haven’t encountered it; I’m presuming it is no longer standing. I’d love to get an identification if anyone remembers it. [Anne was unable to get a photograph of the front of the house, but these images give a good idea as to its size and layout.]

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Filed under --WASHINGTON COUNTY GA--, Tennille GA

Hall-and-Parlor House, Washington County

Anne Chamlee made this photograph, which she labeled “out in the boonies” in Spring 1991. Its present status is unknown.

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Central Hallway House, Circa 1890, Howard

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Filed under --TAYLOR COUNTY GA--, Howard GA

Vernacular Craftsman House, Circa 1940, Twiggs County

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Eclectic Victorian House, Circa 1910, Jeffersonville

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Filed under --TWIGGS COUNTY GA--, Jeffersonville GA

Saddlebag Georgian Cottage, Jeffersonville

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Filed under --TWIGGS COUNTY GA--, Jeffersonville GA

Hall-and-Parlor House, Twiggs County

This amazing board-and-batten house features a vernacular Greek Revival facade in the form of an open front porch. It’s a very rare form.

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Filed under --TWIGGS COUNTY GA--

Sugar Creek Plantation, 1937, Telfair County

Upon its completion in 1937, this Colonial Revival house became both home and refuge for Eugene Talmadge and his wife, Mattie Thurmond Peterson Talmadge, known to all as Miss Mit. Talmadge had just lost the governor’s race after serving two terms and this country estate provided  him a place to revitalize and plan his political comeback. At the time, Telfair County was still seen as the seat of the Talmadge family and the rural anchorage was important, as Talmadge fancied himself a champion of the common man. The same voters who had rejected him for his lack of cooperation with FDR’s New Deal programs in 1937 returned him to the governor’s office in 1941. By now, Talmadge was relying on his unapologetic brand of racism to reach voters, and it succeeded; his well-attended rallies stoked racist fears among poor whites throughout Georgia.

Eugene Talmadge addressing supporters at Fitzgerald, Georgia, 1940. Photograph by Frances Trammell McCormick. Collection of Brian Brown. Copyright Vanishing South Georgia.

After another absence from office, Talmadge ran again in 1946, and became only the second man in Georgia history to be elected to a fourth term (Joseph E. Brown, the Civil War governor, was the other). He died on 21 December 1946, before he could serve his fourth term. The so-called Three Governors Controversy followed, and soon Talmadge’s son Herman became governor. He later served four terms in the United States Senate.

The family seemed to have little interest in maintaining the house, as they lived their lives far away from Telfair County for the most part, and it fell into a state of neglect. For many years, the fate of Sugar Creek Plantation was uncertain. It had long been in disrepair when former Atlanta Journal-Constitution editor Jim Wooten, a Telfair County native himself, purchased and restored the house and grounds in 2011.

Please note: It is now a private residence and security-monitored.

 

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Filed under --TELFAIR COUNTY GA--

Queen Anne House, Circa 1890, McRae

This beautifully maintained Queen Anne has been in the same family since its construction.

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Filed under --TELFAIR COUNTY GA--, McRae GA