Tag Archives: South Georgia Medical History

Patterson-Goodman House, 1929, Cuthbert

This Tudor Revival home was designed for Dr. and Mrs. Job Caldwell Patterson by the firm of Dennis and Dennis. The 3 fireplaces are made of travertine which was mined near Grier’s Cave, located 7 miles north of Cuthbert. Dr. Patterson was a well-loved local physician who served as President of the Medical Association of Georgia.

Cuthbert Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --RANDOLPH COUNTY GA--, Cuthbert GA

Dr. George Young Moore Memorial, 1939, Springvale

A first aid station at Springvale was dedicated to the memory of Dr. George Young Moore in 1939. Dr. Moore served as president of the Medical Association of Georgia in 1930-1931.

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Filed under --RANDOLPH COUNTY GA--, Springvale GA

Stewart-Webster Hospital, 1950, Richland

The cornerstone of the hospital is dated 1949 but I understand it wasn’t completed and occupied until 1950. It was sponsored by the Richland Lions Club and Dr. J. T. Phillips was the hospital authority chairman. This is just one of numerous rural hospitals that have closed in recent years, leaving many without accessible major medical care. The politics around the issue go back and forth, but when your county loses a hospital, that’s irrelevant. This particular hospital served two counties.

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Filed under --STEWART COUNTY GA--, Richland GA

Dr. J. A. Sims House, 1910, Richland

Dr. Sims was an oral surgeon and Richland mayor from 1906-1908.

Richland Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --STEWART COUNTY GA--, Richland GA

Perryman Store, Hartsfield

Thanks to Haley Perryman for the identification. She notes that it was originally a doctor’s office.

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Filed under --COLQUITT COUNTY GA--, Hartsfield GA

Gillespie-Selden Institute, Cordele

President’s Home, Circa 1925, Gillespie-Selden Institute

The origins of this important landmark of African-American educational history in South Georgia can be traced to Dr. Augustus S. Clark and the St. Paul Presbyterian Church. The first facilities of the school were three wood-framed buildings, built through a gift of the Gillespie family of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1903, and named the Gillespie Normal School in their honor. The first two structures pictured here were built when it was still known as the Gillespie Normal School.

Girls Dormitory, 1929, Gillespie-Selden Institute

In 1933, the school merged with the Selden Institute in Brunswick and the name was changed to the Gillespie-Selden Institute. Over the years, students came from as far away as New York and New Jersey. The Institute closed in 1956 due to citywide consolidation.

Administration Building, 1937, Gillespie-Selden Institute

A hospital was built in 1923 and named for its benefactor, Charles Helms. It was a vital part of the institute. (It is still standing but not pictured here; I will add a photograph later). At the time, the nearest hospital for blacks was in Atlanta. Selden Cottage, pictured below, was a school for nurses, associated with the hospital.

Selden Cottage, 1949, Gillespie-Selden Institute

This neighborhood, and particularly the remaining facilities of the Institute, represent a significant resource of a progressive African-American community in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Preliminary efforts to document and preserve the site have been made, but I’m unsure as to their present status.

Gillespie-Selden Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --CRISP COUNTY GA--, Cordele GA

Dismuke & Willis Sanitarium, 1914, Ocilla

Ocilla’s first hospital, with 20 beds, was opened by Dr. Herman Dismuke* and Dr. Gabe Willis in 1914. It originally featured wrap-around porches. Jamie Wilcox Lovett and Cindy Griffin note that this was built by their great-grandfather, Robert Toombs Woolsey. It was replaced by a newer facility in the early 1930s and is now a private residence.

*Dr. Dismuke was the most beloved physician in Irwin County during his lifetime. He delivered thousands of babies, promoted modern health and sanitary practices through his work with the clinic at Irwinville Farms during the Great Depression and served as the county doctor.

Sandra Crouch Irons writes: My grandfather, Thomas A. Crouch, purchased this building to house his wife and family which included 7 children the first of which was born in 1898 and the last in 1911. I’m not exactly sure as to when he purchased the sanitarium, but I do have photographs of my father, Joseph P. Crouch, outside the back porch when he was about 12 which would have made the date around 1923. The sanitarium was never replaced around the 1930s because the Crouch family lived there. I am aware that my grandfather remodeled some of the interior, but the exterior remained basically the same until it was sold somewhere around the late 1980s/early 90s. I lived in and grew up in this house from 1954, when my father retired from the Marines and moved back to Ocilla, until I went to college in 1965. My husband, Stephen Irons, our daughter, Jennifer, and I continued to visit my parents and Aunt Joree who continued to live here until the house was sold.

 

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Filed under --IRWIN COUNTY GA--, Ocilla GA