Tag Archives: South Georgia Pioneers

Prospect Primitive Baptist Church, Clinch County

There are some nice older graves in the cemetery. I’m sharing a few examples. These were pioneers of Wiregrass Georgia.

I always like finding these wooden markers. They were much more common in the past but many have been lost to the elements or replaced with more permanent markers.

James T. (4 June 1831-17 March 1887) & Martha (1 February 1833-17 April 1900) Touchton. The stone of James is signed by the carvers, Wilcox & Lamance of Brunswick.

George H. Hutto (1 September 1895-6 October 1918) He gave his life for his country.

Randall Skinner, Private, Captain’s Knight’s & Johnston’s Company, 81st Regiment, Georgia Militia, Indian Wars (4 January 1802-15 April 1865)

Edmund Mathis, Private, Carter’s Independents, Indian Wars, (1776-1860)

 

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Filed under --CLINCH COUNTY GA--

Mt. Zion Campground United Methodist Church, 1881, Brooks County

The Georgia Historical Commission marker placed here in 1956 reads: The first Camp Meeting was held on this site in 1828 by a “few scattered Methodists” before any Methodist Church in the area was organized. William Hendry, William Blair and Hamilton W. Sharpe, as a committee, selected the site. Rev. Adam Wyrick was the first visiting preacher. In 1831 Sion and Enoch Hall deeded the land on which the Camp Ground stood to the Methodist Episcopal Church. Housed first in a brush-arbor, the weeklong meetings were held without interruption until 1881. Then the camp meetings ceased and the nearby church was built. Meetings were practically continuous each day from sunrise until after “candle-lighting.”

The sign on the church states that the present building dates to 1856, which is plausible considering the architecture, but according to the two sources I have access to, the historical marker and the South Georgia Conference of the United Methodist Church, the date is 1881. I hope to learn more about this discrepancy.

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Filed under --BROOKS COUNTY GA--

Frontier Village, Fort Gaines

Frontier Village is a collection of publicly accessible historic structures located adjacent to the replica of the 1816 blockhouse. There’s no admission cost. The two houses below are a good general representation of early styles common in the area in the 19th century.

Newt Engram Dogtrot House. Originally located in Lightard Knot Springs near Zetto, this is thought to have been built by Seaborn P. Engram and passed to Newt Engram. (Some Engrams in Clay County spelled their name with an “E” while others in the family spelled it with an “I”. Since I’m not a genealogist, I’m not quite sure the distinction).

Herbert and Liza Ingram House. This single-pen log house was originally located near Sutton’s Corner.

 

 

 

 

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Filed under --CLAY COUNTY GA--, Fort Gaines GA

Sutlive House, 1820, Fort Gaines

This is one of the oldest houses in Fort Gaines and aside from being enlarged and stylistic elements added, retains much of its original appearance.

Fort Gaines Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --CLAY COUNTY GA--, Fort Gaines GA

Plantation Plain Farmhouse, Wayne County

A historic preservationist has suggested to me that he believes this to be one of the oldest surviving houses in lower Southeast Georgia, perhaps dating to the 1830s. Definitely antebellum and likely built within the first three decades of settlement in Wayne County, it features a recessed chimney and original log attached kitchen.

 

 

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Filed under --WAYNE COUNTY GA--

Hageman House, 1896, Fitzgerald

This is the oldest house in the city of Fitzgerald, dating to the year the city was colonized by Union veterans; at the time of its construction it was considered a country house but is well within the city limits today. [I grew up just across a large pecan orchard from it]. It was built by original settler Adrian Hageman, who served as a corporal in Company D, 93rd Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, during the Civil War. His wife was Fannie Protsman Hageman, a native of Vevay, Indiana. It was restored by their grandson, Charlie A. Newcomer, Jr., in 1970.

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Filed under --BEN HILL COUNTY GA--, Fitzgerald GA

“Twin Houses” of Norman Park

Thanks to Meredith Kelley Zidek, I finally know the identity of the house pictured above. She writes: It’s my understanding that one house was Vernon Franklin Norman’s (25 October 1869-30 December 1920), and the other was Marion Davis Norman’s (28 June 1862-30 January 1928). Their sister was Sarah Ann Norman, my great grandmother. (Meredith notes that this is how she understands it). If it was built after M. D. Norman’s house, it probably dates to around 1908-10 or thereabouts. The Normans were members of the founding family of Norman Park and the Norman Institute. The house was obscured for many years by pines. After clearing them and vastly improving the landscape, the present owners have given new life to what many readers and contacts have called the “Twin Houses of Norman Park” or “The Norman Park Twins”. The  M. D. Norman House (below), across US319, has been one of my most popular photographs but since I got new photographs, I thought I’d share.

 

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Filed under --COLQUITT COUNTY GA--, Norman Park GA

Simeon Brinson House, 1893, Brinson

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This grand Victorian was built by Simeon Brinson (1847-1918), founder of the town that bears his name. In the 1870s, Simeon bought large tracts of land in the area and surveyed the area for a town in 1889, after the coming of the railroad. He served as a postmaster in the town’s early days and after it was incorporated in 1907 was its first mayor. The family owned the only bank in the town, as well as a cotton warehouse.

Brinson Family Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --DECATUR COUNTY GA--, Brinson GA

Curry Hill, Circa 1855, Decatur County

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Duncan Curry, Jr., son of a state representative and senator and one of the earliest settlers of this section of Georgia, established a plantation in 1842 on property that had included an important early stagecoach stop. As the plantation expanded to eventually cover several thousand acres, the family lived in a log house next to the old stagecoach house. The present house was built in the mid-1850s. It also served as a de facto neighborhood school.

In addition to their farming and entrepreneurial activities, Duncan, with his brother Calvin, built the first Presbyterian church in this section around this time. At the outset of the Civil War, Curry rallied a group of local men for the cause. They became Company F, Fiftieth Georgia Regiment, under Curry’s command. Injured in Maryland, Curry returned to the plantation and helped secure supplies for the local effort. His son, Perry, was killed in the war.

National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --DECATUR COUNTY GA--

Single-Pen Log Farmhouse, Toombs County

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This structure is already in ruins but I felt it needed documenting.

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Filed under --TOOMBS COUNTY GA--