Tag Archives: South Georgia Politicians

Dr. J. A. Sims House, 1910, Richland

Dr. Sims was an oral surgeon and Richland mayor from 1906-1908.

Richland Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --STEWART COUNTY GA--, Richland GA

Cobb House, 1850s, Americus

The central portion of this house, thought to date to around 1850, was originally located in the nearby town of Oglethorpe. A terrible epidemic there in 1862 left as many as 100 dwellings uninhabited and the house was purchased by Colonel Charles J. Malone and moved to Americus. Captain John A. Cobb, a Georgia legislator, bought it in 1883 and it remained in his family for well over a century.

Americus Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --SUMTER COUNTY GA--, Americus GA

Clary-Whaley House, Circa 1869, Jesup

Willis Clary established what would become Jesup at Station Number 6 on the Atlantic & Gulf Railroad line in early 1869. He paid to have the town surveyed and built this house on City Lot #1, presumably around the time the survey was done. Clary would serve as Jesup’s first mayor. As he and wife Lucinda Hall Lee had no children of their own, his stepdaughter, Georgia Lee Whaley, eventually inherited the home.

It appears to have originated as a simple central hallway structure. Expanded over the years, it’s presently used as an office.

 

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Filed under --WAYNE COUNTY GA--, Jesup GA

Brewton-Hendrix House House, Circa 1858, Evans County

Oral tradition suggests that this Plantation Plain farmhouse was built for Jonathan Bacon Brewton (1827-1897) by Amos Hearn, the builder of the nearby A. D. Eason House. Brewton was the son of one of the area’s earliest settlers, Benjamin Brewton, who came to Tattnall County (now Evans) in 1794 from Warren County. He married Margaret Everett in 1848 and one of their sons, John Carter Brewton, was a co-founder and the first president of Brewton-Parker College.

Jonathan served as Clerk of the Superior Court of Tattnall County and two terms in the Georgia House of Representatives . From late 1862 until early 1864 he was active in the 5th Georgia Cavalry but returned before war’s end upon his  election as clerk of the court. In 1865 a foraging party of Union troops passed through the area and ransacked the house. After the war, Brewton continued his enterprises and also operated a general store and post office.  The community around the house and store was known as Haw Pond at the time. Brewton also owned a gristmill, lumber mill and cotton gin. Brewton’s heirs sold the house to one of their former sharecroppers, James A. Hendrix, in 1936. The Willcox family has owned it since 1990.

Source: Pharris DeLoach Johnson,  Houses of Heart Pine: A Survey of the Antebellum Architecture of Evans County, Georgia.

 

 

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Filed under --EVANS COUNTY GA--

A. D. Eason House, 1857, Undine

Abraham Darlington Eason (1816-1887) was the youngest son of William Eason, who founded the first Methodist church (Mt. Carmel) in Tattnall County after migrating from Colleton County, South Carolina. Abraham married Susan Tillman (1827-1907) in 1843. The young coupled settled near the Tillman ferry operation on the Canoochee River, in what is now the community of Undine. They first built a log house. Abraham was very industrious and deeply involved in the community, serving in the state house, as justice of the Inferior Court and tax collector and receiver. In just a few years he had acquired over 5500 acres, which he doubled with the purchase of his father-in-law’s estate in 1851. (This historical background comes from the excellent work of Pharris DeLoach Johnson, Houses of Heart Pine: A Survey of the Antebellum Architecture of Evans County, Georgia).

In 1854, Eason began acquiring materials for the construction of a permanent home to replace the log cabin and in 1856 hired Amos Hearn, a local carpenter, to complete the project. As with nearly all large Southern houses of the era, slaves were likely integral to the construction process. The family still owns many of the detailed ledgers A. D. kept during construction of the house.

Meticulous attention is being afforded the restoration of the house. I spoke at great length with the present owner’s (Paul Eason) son, Joey McCullough, about the process and the family is very committed to maintaining the integrity of this important landmark.

A tobacco barn built in the 1930s remains on the property.

A log corn crib is present, as well, but the only thing holding it up are the trees that have grown up beside it.

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Filed under --EVANS COUNTY GA--, Undine GA

George W. Jackson House, 1898, Baconton

George Washington Jackson came with his family to Dougherty County from Wilkinson County as a young boy. At the age of ten he moved with his widowed mother and brother and sister to the Mount Enon community, several miles from Baconton. He served as a lieutenant in the Confederate army and later as a county commissioner. He had farming operations all over what is today northern Mitchell County; he built this home in 1898 to replace a log farmhouse at this location. He and his wife, Eulelia Peacock Jackson, had nine children. Numerous other families lived here throughout the 20th century.

The city of Baconton saving such an important historic home and re-purposing it as their city hall is a great example of thinking outside the box. Perhaps it will serve as inspiration for other communities to pursue non-traditional avenues of preservation.

National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --MITCHELL COUNTY GA--, Baconton GA

Orien T. Gower House, 1920, Cordele

This was built for Orien Thomas Gower, Sr. (1879-1960), who served as judge of the Crisp Judicial Circuit for over sixteen years. I’m grateful to Cindie Craig for allowing me to photograph the wonderful trompe l’oeil ceiling in the dining room. Cindie and her husband Marvin are in the process of restoring the house.

The trompe l’oeil is painted on plaster and though it needs some slight cleaning and a cosmetic touch-up, it’s in amazing condition for its age.

O’Neal School Neighborhood Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --CRISP COUNTY GA--, Cordele GA

F. Willis Dart House, 1898, Douglas

Dart served as mayor of Douglas in the early 20th century.

Gaskin Avenue Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --COFFEE COUNTY GA--, Douglas GA

Thomas W. Smith House, 1900, Tennille

This homes was built for Tennille merchant and Mayor, Thomas W. Smith, whose family lived here for over 85 years.  The National Register nomination form notes: …the Thomas W. Smith House typifies Choate’s residential architectural designs during the early years of his architectural career. Charles E. Choate (1865-1929) was a minister-architect prolific in Georgia and adjacent states at the turn of the last century; the greatest concentration of his work can be found in the Tennille-Sandersville area.

National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --WASHINGTON COUNTY GA--, Tennille GA

Way House, 1895, Hawkinsville

Built by J. L. Huggins for Sam and Mary Amanda Way, this is one of several outstanding Victorians in Hawkinsville’s residential historic district. Sam Way served as mayor of Hawkinsville and later as a Georgia State Representative.

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Filed under --PULASKI COUNTY GA--, Hawkinsville GA