Tag Archives: The Civil War in South Georgia

Effie Sharp Bush, Widow of Georgia’s Last Confederate Soldier, Fitzgerald, Circa 1977

The lady in this photograph was Mrs. Effie Tinnell Sharp Bush [1887-1980], widow of Georgia’s last surviving Confederate soldier, William Joshua Bush [1845-1952]. ‘Uncle Josh’ as family and close friends knew him, was afforded the honorific ‘General’ Bush in recognition of his connection to the Civil War. I haven’t been able to confirm it, but it’s likely that Mrs. Bush was also the last surviving Confederate widow in Georgia. This snapshot was made in the late 1970s during a town festival by a member of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, who graciously gave me the photograph.

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Filed under --BEN HILL COUNTY GA--, Fitzgerald GA

Fair Haven United Methodist Church, 1846, Jenkins County

Francis Jones brought his family from North Carolina to this section of Georgia before the Revolutionary War and the family has maintained land and been involved in the social and religious development ever since. His four great-grandsons, Henry, William, Joseph, and James, were responsible for the construction of Fair Haven, which stands today as one of the great architectural treasures of rural Georgia.

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Filed under --JENKINS COUNTY GA--

Saffold, Georgia

Saffold is located just across the Chattahoochee River from Alabama. It was the site of the Southern Confederate States Navy Yard during the Civil War and at least one gunboat, aptly named Chattahoochee, was completed here.

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Filed under --EARLY COUNTY GA--, Saffold GA

Curry Hill, Circa 1855, Decatur County

curry-hill-plantation-decatur-county-ga-photograph-copyright-brian-brown-vanishing-south-georgia-usa-2017

Duncan Curry, Jr., son of a state representative and senator and one of the earliest settlers of this section of Georgia, established a plantation in 1842 on property that had included an important early stagecoach stop. As the plantation expanded to eventually cover several thousand acres, the family lived in a log house next to the old stagecoach house. The present house, in the Plantation Plain style with a Greek Revival entryway, was built in the mid-1850s. It also served as a de facto neighborhood school.

In addition to their farming and entrepreneurial activities, Duncan, with his brother Calvin, built the first Presbyterian church in this section around this time. At the outset of the Civil War, Curry rallied a group of local men for the cause. They became Company F, Fiftieth Georgia Regiment, under Curry’s command. Injured in Maryland, Curry returned to the plantation and helped secure supplies for the local effort. His son, Perry, was killed in the war.

National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --DECATUR COUNTY GA--

Brooks County Courthouse, 1864, Quitman

brooks-county-courthouse-quitman-ga-photograph-copyright-brian-brown-vanishing-south-georgia-usa-2017

Though the Brooks County Courthouse is generally noted as having been built in 1859, that date is misleading. Construction began that year, but due to the Civil War and the death of contractor Charles H. Remington in 1862, the courthouse was not completed until 1864. It was extensively remodeled in 1892 by the firm of Bruce & Morgan, in the Italian Renaissance Revival style.

National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --BROOKS COUNTY GA--, Quitman GA

Donald Barton Frederick House, Circa 1865, Marshallville

historic marshallville ga donald barton frederick house photograph copyright brian brown vanihsing south georgia usa 2016

James Frederick began building this Greek Revival townhouse in 1860 but soon sold it to his first cousin, Donald Barton Frederick. D. B. Frederick completed the house around 1865 and lived here until his death in 1911. Later owners have been the Paullin and Minnich families.

West Main Street Residential District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --MACON COUNTY GA--, Marshallville GA

George H. Slappey House, 1850s, Marshallville

historic marshallville ga slappey camp house photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2016

One of Marshallville’s most imposing structures, this home, like so many others of its era, began on a much smaller scale. Originally a four-room frame house, it was built by E. S. Crocker, likely in the mid-1850s. George Hiley Slappey purchased it about 1860 and used slave labor to expand it to its present appearance. It was included in the Historic American Buildings Survey in the 1930s, confirming its architectural significance. It was later owned by the Camp family. Debbie Dunning Liipfert notes that it’s been known as the Camp-Liipfert House since 1980… Wonderful home and happily raised our children and welcome family. It’s also been referred to as the Camp-Slappey House. The image below, in the public domain, dates to the mid-1930s. HABS GA-174. Courtesy Library of Congress.

Slappey House, Marshallville, Macon County, GA Photos from Survey HABS GA-147 public domain courtesy library of congress

West Main Street Residential District, National Register of Historic Places

 

 

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Filed under --MACON COUNTY GA--, Marshallville GA