Tag Archives: The Revolutionary War in South Georgia

Revolutionary War Cemetery, Louisville

This secluded cemetery, historically known as Old Capitol Cemetery, is located on the western edge of Louisville on US Highway 221. Notable as the final resting place of two of the best-known politicians of early Georgia (one considered such a scoundrel that newspapers of the period cheered his passing with sarcastic obituaries), it also contains cenotaphs for men who fought in the American Revolution, the War of 1812, and the Civil War, as well as early Louisville settlers.

Senator James Gunn (13 March 1753-30 July 1801) – Though the headstone notes his rank in the Georgia Militia, Gunn was, more importantly, one of Georgia’s first two United States Senators.

James Gunn came from Virginia to Savannah where he began practicing law. He was a captain of a volunteer brigade of dragoons in the Revolutionary War and was among General Anthony Wayne’s forces who helped drive the British from Savannah. He was made a brigadier general in the state militia after the Revolution. He was elected to the Continental Congress in 1787 but did not serve. Along with William Few, he was one of Georgia’s first two U. S. Senators, elected as a Federalist in 1789. He attended Washington’s inauguration in New York City. Unfortunately, in 1794 Gunn was one of the primary figures in the Yazoo Land Fraud, having been an organizer of the Georgia Company which perpetrated the fraud. He delayed formal submission of the Georgia Company’s proposal to sell off western lands until after his reelection to the Senate. As soon as it became public, Gunn was the subject of outrage throughout the state but no formal charges were ever brought against him. Upon his death, just four months after his term in the Senate had ended, Gunn was ridiculed in obituaries around the state.  Gunn’s wife, Mary Jane Wright (6 December 1763-13 May 1796) of Savannah, committed suicide by drinking poison. She was buried at the family cemetery at Litchfield Plantation.

Though Gunn’s reputation is questionable, the damage to his gravestone is very unfortunate. It was carved by James Traquair, a Scottish immigrant who became a prominent stonecutter in Philadelphia. Traquair worked with America’s first professional architect, Benjamin Latrobe.

Roger Lawson Gamble (1787-20 December 1847) – Gamble grew up near Louisville and was admitted to the bar in 1815, having served as an officer in the War of 1812 and a member of the state house (1814-1815). He served as Georgia’s Attorney General from 1816-1822. He was elected as a Jacksonian to the 23rd Congress in 1832, serving one term. He was again elected, as a Whig, to the 27th Congress in 1841. He served as a judge of the Superior Court from 1845-1847. The crypt was carved by W. Glendinning, a stone mason active in Augusta in the mid-19th century. [Source 1859 Augusta City Directory].

John Gamble (1740- 1806) – Georgia Troops, Revolutionary War – I’m unable to confirm that John Gamble is a relative of Roger Lawson Gamble but assume there to be a connection. In 1772, John emigrated to Brunswick, Georgia, on the Brittania.

Major Patrick Carr (? Ireland-1802) – Georgia Troops, Revolutionary War – Carr was present at the Battle of Kings Mountain.

Roger Lawson (17 May 1730 or 1731-6 August 1803) – Georgia Troops, Revolutionary War

Captain Chesley Bostwick (1744-2 January 1808) – 7th Continental Georgia Battalion, Revolutionary War

Nathan Bostwick (26 January 1746-9 May 1817) – Georgia Troops, Revolutionary War – Bostiwick was born in Suffolk County, Virginia. He may have been the brother of Chesley, but this is not presently confirmed.

Phillip Scott (?-21 October 1817) – Georgia Troops, Revolutionary War

Private William Walker, Sr. (17 December 1762-2 February 1818) – Georgia Troops, Revolutionary War – Walker was born in Buckingham County, Virginia.

Aaron Tomlinson (1748-12 April 1828) – Georgia Troops, Revolutionary War

Captain Ambrose Wright (1745-1805) – Georgia Troops, Revolutionary War

Mary Hubbel Savage Wright (28 December1825-23 June 1854) – Mary was the first wife of Confederate Major General Ambrose Ransom “Rans” Wright, who was possibly the son of Captain Ambrose Wright.  She was the daughter of Dr. William & Mary Savage, of Augusta. She died in childbirth, and her twins are buried within this enclosure, as well. Though Findagrave notes that this may only be a memorial and that Mary may actually be buried at Magnolia Cemetery in Augusta, this seems unlikely, as the text of the stone notes that her remains are here. Investigation into the matter is needed to confirm.

Thompson Markers – Various members of the Thompson family, representing three wars, are memorialized here. It is possible that these are cenotaphs and the exact whereabouts of the decedents within the cemetery is unknown.

John Thompson and William Thompson are both listed with birthdates of 1750 and death dates of 1826, and with notice of service in the Continental Line, Revolutionary War.

William Thompson (1790-1872) – Captain, Johnson’s Company, Georgia Militia, War of 1812

Judith Price Thompson (1798-1840) – Wife of Captain William Thompson

Seaborn Jones Thompson (1827-1866) – Company H, 63rd Georgia Infantry, CSA

Joseph Maybank Jones (7 May 1804-5 January 1831) – Jones, a native of Liberty County, died near Louisville on his way home from the legislature in Milledgeville and was buried here.

Family of Owen (9 March 1806-27 January 1877) & Bdelia (11 March 1811-15 September 1884) McDermott . Fourteen more family members are buried here.

Seth Pierce (1756-1841) Revoultionary War Veteran & Obediah Pierce (1805-1884) – Cenotaph. Obediah’s three children are memorialzed, as well. His sons, Obediah, Jr., and John W. were Confederate soldiers, who appear to have died in service. His daughter, Susan Pierce Stevens, was buried in Cedar Hill Cemetery in Dawson, Georgia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Filed under --JEFFERSON COUNTY GA--, Louisville GA

Big Buckhead Baptist Church, 1845, Jenkins County

Big Buckhead Church Jenkins County GA Antebellum Greek Revival Landmark Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2013

Named for nearby Buckhead Creek, this congregation dates to before the Revolutionary War. Matthew Moore, the Baptist minister who organized the church, was a Loyalist who returned to England near the onset of the war.

Big Buckhead Baptist Church Jenkins County GA Antebellum Landmark Civil War Site Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2013

The church was reconstituted on 11 September 1787. James Matthews was the pastor and Sanders Walker & Josiah Taylor were the presbytery. The present church building is the fourth on this site. Significantly in the history of the Georgia Baptists, the Hephzibah Association was organized here and the first plans for Mercer University were proposed.

Big Buckhead Church Jenkins County GA Antebellum Landmark 3rd Oldest Baptist Church in State Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2013

A historic marker headlined Cavalry Action at Buckhead Church reads: On November 28, 1864, the 3rd Cavalry Division [USA], Brigadier General J. L. Kilpatrick, USA, was driven south from Waynesboro by the Cavalry Corps, Army of Tennessee [CSA], Major General Joseph Wheeler, CSA. Retreating under constant harassment by Wheeler’s men, Kilpatrick’s command commenced crossing Buckhead Creek east of the church. The rear guard ( Second and Third Kentucky cavalry regiments) was attacked before crossing but, supported by the Fifth Kentucky, the Ninth Pennsylvania and the Tenth Wisconsin Battery, it beat off the attack and crossed, burning the bridge behind it. With the bridge gone and the crossing defended by the Fifth Ohio Cavalry, Wheeler moved upstream, effected his crossing, and again attack Kilpatrick’s command which, in the meantime, had entrenched about three miles west of the church near Reynolds’ plantation.

Reaching the enemy position, Wheeler sent Dibrell’s brigade to attack the right, Ashby’s brigade to turn the left, and launched a frontal charge with the Third Arkansas and Eighth and Eleventh Texas cavalry regiments; but Kilpatrick managed to extricate his command as darkness set in and retreated six miles toward Louisville where Sherman’s Left Wing was encamped. Wheeler then resumed his mission of attacking Union foraging parties which were attempting to strip the countryside of animals and provisions.

Big Buckhead Baptist Church Jenkins County GA Antebellum Landmark Slat Back Pews Interior Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2013

The church and cemetery are located west of Perkins off U. S. Highway 25.

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Filed under --JENKINS COUNTY GA--

Shiloh Primitive Baptist Church, 1927, Blackshear

historic shiloh primitive baptist church blackshear ga photograph copyright brian brown vanishing souh georgia usa 2013

Organized in 1833, Shiloh’s earliest members are some of the first settlers of this section of Georgia.

historic shiloh primitive baptist blackshear ga photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2013

The congregation is still active today; storm windows have been placed inside to give some protection against weather, and new restrooms with modern plumbing are adjacent to the church.

historic shiloh primitive baptist church pierce county ga photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2013

historic shiloh primitive baptist interior blackshear ga photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2013

historic shiloh primitive baptist church pierce county ga interior photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2013

The rafters pictured above serve as hat racks, each studded with nails for that purpose.

historic shiloh cemetery blackshear ga photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2013

Shiloh’s large cemetery suggests an old and active congregation.

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Private Isham Peacock, North Carolina Militia, Revolutionary War (8  October 1742 – 1851)

Isham Peacock was one of the most influential early Baptists in Georgia, and certainly the most influential of the Primitive Baptists. After first joining Lott’s Creek Primitive Baptist Church in Bulloch County around 1802, he went on to establish Black Creek, Beard’s Creek, Salem, and most notably, High Bluff at Schlatterville. As to Peacock’s theology, it was decidedly Calvinistic. Historian Michael Holt notes that he was quick to speak out against the proper “discipline” of the Baptist faith. “In 1830, he was able to get Beard’s Creek Church to adopt a resolution forbidding Missionary and temperance speakers from taking the pulpit there. However, they rescinded the resolution as soon as he moved to Pierce County. Though he was alleged to be sober, he was known to demonstrate his aversion to temperance societies by carrying a cane full of whisky he used to refresh himself while preaching…The disgust Peacock showed toward organized attempts to regulate public morality was typical of frontier Baptists.”–Michael Holt, (Thesis) The “Gold Standard” of the Wiregrass Primitive Baptists of Georgia: A History of the Crawford Faction of the Alabaha River Primitive Baptist Association, 1842-2007, Valdosta State University, 2009. In addition to these activities, Peacock founded the first Baptist church in present-day Florida in 1821 (Pigeon Creek Primitive Baptist Church near present-day Boulogne). For a brief time, it represented an extension of Baptist theology into a foreign territory, as this was still part of Spanish Florida at the time and therefore was technically against the laws of Spain regarding the establishment of non-Catholic churches. Elder Peacock’s last church was Providence Primitive Baptist in Ware County, where he was preaching at age 101; blindness ultimately ended his life of preaching and he moved to the Jacksonville area. On a trip to visit family members in Pierce County in 1851, at the age of 107, Peacock died and was buried at Shiloh.

shiloh-primitive-baptist-church-blackshear-ga-pierce-county-cemetery-james-strickland-photograph-copyright-brian-brown-vanishing-south-georgia-usa-2013

James Strickland (1789?  – 7 June 1849)

shiloh-primitive-baptist-church-blackshear-ga-nancy-stewart-photograph-copyright-brian-brown-vanishing-south-georgia-usa-2013

Nancy (Wife of E. F.) Stewart (12 February 1818 – 7 May 1882)

historic shiloh primitive baptist cemetery blackshear ga confederate headstones photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2013

L-R: Private James Stewart, Company D, 26th Georgia Infantry; 1st Sergeant Colquitt Stewart, Company D, 26th Georgia Infantry; Junior 2nd Lieutenant James Sweat, Company N, 26th Georgia Infantry

historic shiloh primitive baptist cemetery pierce county ga photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2013

Thomas Family Marker

James & Sarah from SC (South Carolina) to McIntosh (County) About 1790. Absalom to Ware Before 1824. Banner, Lewis, James R. by 1829. Gravesite of Lewis Thomas (1789 – 1860) Elizabeth M. Thomas (1795 – 1863)

1. Redden (b. 1810) married Suzannah

2. James R. (1811 – 1884) married Martha Leggett (1830 – 1918)

3. Marantha (1822 – 1890) married William Chancey (1825 – 1883)

4. Martha (b. 1823) married David Cason (b. 1812)

5. Sarah (b. 1825) married Thomas Dyal

6. Absalom (b. 1827) married Elizabeth Walker (b. 1827)

7. Lewis, Jr. (1830 – 1893) married Prucie Eason (1835 – 1919)

8. Banner (1833 – 1885) married Mary Walker (1837 – 1877)

9. Elizabeth (b. 1835) married Martin Nettles, Jr.

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Filed under --PIERCE COUNTY GA--, Blackshear GA

High Bluff Primitive Baptist Church, Schlatterville

historic high bluff primitive baptist church raybon ga photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 20133

Originating on a high bluff of the Satilla River near Raybon in 1819, this congregation is one of the oldest and most historic in Brantley County. Mrs. Martha Mizell Puckett’s history of the church highlights much more information. There is no consensus as to why these early settlers left Raybon, but Judge Folks Huxford, South Georgia’s best-known genealogist, suggested they came to the Schlatterville area around 1822 to escape a cholera outbreak.

historic high bluff church raybon ga photograph copyright bian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2013

For a time, the congregation was known as Big Creek, but restored the name of High Bluff Church between 1878-80.

historic high bluff primitive baptist church brantley county ga interior photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2013

Still active, High Bluff is the largest congregation in the Alabaha Primitive Baptist Church Association.

historic high bluff primitive baptist church raybon ga seat cushions photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2013

Seat cushions and funeral home fans are the only “modern conveniences” to be found at High Bluff.

historic high bluff cemetery raybon ga photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2013

What moved me the most at this location was the magnificent cemetery, one of the largest in the area and the final resting place of many pioneers of South Georgia. I think of it as a sort of rural Bonaventure and could spend countless hours wandering its historic lots. A comprehensive guide to interments has been compiled for researchers and those with an interest in locating ancestors.

historic-high-bluff-primitive-baptist-church-cemetery-brantley-county-ga-lydia-a-stone-queen-of-the-okefenokee-photograph-copyright-brian-brown-vanishing-south-georgia-usa-2013Lydia A. Stone (27 June 1864 – 4 January 1938)

In a lot near the front of the church can be found the burial place of Lydia A. Stone, who was known as the Queen of the Okefenokee for her vast land holdings and business successes. Also buried here is her first husband, D. G. Stone (19 October 1878 – 18 August 1926), her second husband and heir, John Melton Crews (17 August 1906 – 7 January 1970), as well as his second wife, Kissie (8 September 1913 – 15 November 1947), and Mrs. Stone’s parents.

historic high bluff cemetery brantley county ga picket fence photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2013

Adjacent to the Stone plot are two picketed enclosures retaining what appears to be the original woodwork, quite a rarity in the coastal climate of Brantley County.

historic-high-bluff-primitive-baptist-church-cemetery-brantley-county-ga-john-ammons-revolutionary-war-marions-men-photograph-copyright-brian-brown-vanishing-south-georgia-usa-2013John Ammons, NC & GA Militias Revolutionary War (1760 – 1852) One of Marion’s Men

This headstone, placed by the Sons of the American Revolution,  is of great significance to genealogists and students of the American Revolution for its connection to General Francis Marion, better known as the Swamp Fox.

historic high bluff primitive baptist church cemetery circus headstone photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2013Daniel F. Gill, Sr. (15 September 1905 – 18 December 1981)

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Filed under --BRANTLEY COUNTY GA--, Schlatterville GA