Tag Archives: –TREUTLEN COUNTY GA–

Tomb of Governor Troup, Lothair

This sandstone enclosure is the de facto memorial to one of early Georgia’s best known politicians, Governor George Michael* Troup (8 September 1780-26 April 1856). The obelisk was placed in 1848 upon the death of Troup’s brother, Robert Lachlan Troup (1784-1848). The enclosure was built by slaves from sandstone quarried nearby at Berry Hill Bluff of the Oconee River.

*- Some sources assert that Troup’s middle name was actually McIntosh. This is due to the fact that Troup’s mother was a McIntosh and he was born at McIntosh’s Bluff on Alabama’s Tombigbee River, which was part of Georgia at the time of the governor’s birth.

Detail of engraving of George Troup from The Life of George M. Troup by Edward Jenkins Harden, 1859. Public domain.

Governor Troup spent most of his time after his 1833 retirement at Val d’ Osta, his home in Dublin. He died while visiting Rosemont Plantation, one of numerous properties he owned in Laurens and Montgomery counties. A man of his time, Troup was a fierce supporter of slavery, owning around 400 human beings during his lifetime. It is also suggested that, like many slave owners, he fathered children with some of his female slaves.

Troup served as a state representative, member of the House of Representatives, United States senator, and two-term governor of Georgia (1823-1827).  Georgia’s best-known politician of the era, William Harris Crawford, encouraged Troup to run for governor. His first run was unsuccessful, due largely to the deep divide between the aristocratic planter class (by now known as Troupites) and the common farmers and frontier settlers (known as Clarkites, for John Clark) that had dominated state politics since the late 18th century. The state largely favored the Clarkites, but when Clark chose not to run in 1823, Troup was elected as an alternative. As a Democratic-Republican governor he ensured the removal of the Creek peoples from Georgia, a dubious achievement from a modern perspective. His endorsement of the Treaty of Indian Springs was met with an amended version from President John Quincy Adams, who favored allowing the Creeks slightly more land, but Troup ordered the militia to enforce his version. President Adams capitulated, not wanting to go to “war” with Troup over the Indian issue. He eventually became a strong Jacksonian Democrat and was nationally recognized for being a champion of states’ rights.

The ornamental iron gate was designed by Savannah blacksmiths D. & W. Rose.

Governor Troup was the namesake of Troup County, and Troupville, the first permanent county seat of Lowndes County. The present county seat of Lowndes County, Valdosta, is named for his plantation, Val d’ Osta.

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Filed under --TREUTLEN COUNTY GA--, Lothair GA

Board-and-Batten Tenant Farmhouse, Lothair

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Log Tobacco Barn, Lothair

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Oconee River, Wheeler-Treutlen County Line

 

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Board-and-Batten Farmhouse, Treutlen County

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This house has an addition at the rear, also of board-and-batten construction.

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Durden’s Grocery, Treutlen County

blackville-ga-smokehouse-photograph-copyright-brian-brown-vanishing-south-georgia-usa-2012

This is located near Blackville. On 26 April 2020, about eight years after I first photographed it, I met the owner, who happens to be the great-great granddaughter of the Durden family who once operated the store.

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Filed under --TREUTLEN COUNTY GA--, Blackville GA

Chicken & Barbeque Stand, Soperton

soperton ga chicken bbq stand photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2011

Bill Ricks writes: Another part of J. W. Daniels’s ventures. He came from a poor, working family. He walked several miles to Soperton to work. He always has liked people and enjoyed providing good service at long hours. He has operated a skating rink, picture show, and a grocery store at the building now occupied by Soperton Farm Center. There’s a photo on my blog in 2006 when he began building at the pictured location. He is a true example of American entrepreneurship.

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Treutlen County Courthouse, 1920, Soperton

treutlen county courthouse soperton ga photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2011

This courthouse was designed by J. J. Baldwin, who also designed the Candler and Evans County courthouses of the same era.

National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --TREUTLEN COUNTY GA--, Soperton GA

O’Connor Horses & Mules Mural, Soperton

soperton ga o connor horses mules coca cola mural photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2011

Bill Ricks writes: Until about two years ago the top of the sign was covered by a Firestone sign. The J. G. Webbs opened their business in the late 40s after Mr. Webb’s military service ended. He was experience in radio and electronics, and both of them were frugal and hardworking retailers. They lived in the building up until about late 50s or early 60s, and the business was open until Mr. Webb died. Beside Firestone tires, they had the local franchises for Snapper, Zenith, GE, and others. Mrs. Webb was related to the O’Connors. The original horse and mule business was operated by John Fisher and Mr. Lowrey. J. B. O’Connor was a business and political leader in Treutlen and Montgomery counties.

 

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Filed under --TREUTLEN COUNTY GA--, Soperton GA

Bill Ricks’s Photographs, Soperton

soperton ga william a bill ricks photography display photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2010

These are just a few of Bill Ricks’s images of life in and around Soperton, Georgia, over the past few decades. Mr. Ricks was an army veteran and a photographer who documented just about everything of note in his home county. And in the tradition of small town photographers, he enjoyed sharing his work. Many of his images were displayed in the windows of the old Moring’s Cash Store, but I’m told they are gone now. Luckily, the images are archived online. I believe Mr. Ricks passed away in 2011; I regret that I never got to meet him. I hope his images are kept in good shape for future generations. Perhaps his family will do a book of them at some time.

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Filed under --TREUTLEN COUNTY GA--, Soperton GA