Tag Archives: –TREUTLEN COUNTY GA–

Orianna Baptist Church, Treutlen County

The Orianna Baptist Church was established around 1903. In his excellent, Pieces of Our Past*, Scott Thompson writes: The Baptist Church, through its trustees J.M. Hattaway and J.A. Curry, acquired its first church property from P.M. Johnson on August 21, 1903.

*- Though Scott’s blog is focused on Laurens County history, Orianna is located on the Laurens/Treuten line. The Baptist Church, like the community hall, is located on the Treutlen side.

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Filed under --TREUTLEN COUNTY GA--, Orianna GA

Community Hall, Orianna

This building now serves as the Orianna Community Hall; it was originally a general store.

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Board-and-Batten Tenant House, Treutlen County

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Eclectic Vernacular Cottage, Lothair

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Durden House, Treutlen County

This vernacular farmhouse (likely 1870s or 1880s) was the home of the Durden family, who owned and operated the adjacent store. The condition of both the store and farmhouse have greatly declined since I made these photographs in 2012.

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Filed under --TREUTLEN COUNTY GA--, Blackville GA

Tomb of Governor Troup, Lothair

This sandstone enclosure is the de facto memorial to one of early Georgia’s best known politicians, Governor George Michael* Troup (8 September 1780-26 April 1856). The obelisk was placed in 1848 upon the death of Troup’s brother, Robert Lachlan Troup (1784-1848). The enclosure was built by slaves from sandstone quarried nearby at Berry Hill Bluff of the Oconee River.

*- Some sources assert that Troup’s middle name was actually McIntosh. This is due to the fact that Troup’s mother was a McIntosh and he was born at McIntosh’s Bluff on Alabama’s Tombigbee River, which was part of Georgia at the time of the governor’s birth.

Detail of engraving of George Troup from The Life of George M. Troup by Edward Jenkins Harden, 1859. Public domain.

Governor Troup spent most of his time after his 1833 retirement at Val d’ Osta, his home in Dublin. He died while visiting Rosemont Plantation, one of numerous properties he owned in Laurens and Montgomery counties. A man of his time, Troup was a fierce supporter of slavery, owning around 400 human beings during his lifetime. It is also suggested that, like many slave owners, he fathered children with some of his female slaves.

Troup served as a state representative, member of the House of Representatives, United States senator, and two-term governor of Georgia (1823-1827).  Georgia’s best-known politician of the era, William Harris Crawford, encouraged Troup to run for governor. His first run was unsuccessful, due largely to the deep divide between the aristocratic planter class (by now known as Troupites) and the common farmers and frontier settlers (known as Clarkites, for John Clark) that had dominated state politics since the late 18th century. The state largely favored the Clarkites, but when Clark chose not to run in 1823, Troup was elected as an alternative. As a Democratic-Republican governor he ensured the removal of the Creek peoples from Georgia, a dubious achievement from a modern perspective. His endorsement of the Treaty of Indian Springs was met with an amended version from President John Quincy Adams, who favored allowing the Creeks slightly more land, but Troup ordered the militia to enforce his version. President Adams capitulated, not wanting to go to “war” with Troup over the Indian issue. He eventually became a strong Jacksonian Democrat and was nationally recognized for being a champion of states’ rights.

The ornamental iron gate was designed by Savannah blacksmiths D. & W. Rose.

Governor Troup was the namesake of Troup County, and Troupville, the first permanent county seat of Lowndes County. The present county seat of Lowndes County, Valdosta, is named for his plantation, Val d’ Osta.

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Filed under --TREUTLEN COUNTY GA--, Lothair GA

Board-and-Batten Tenant Farmhouse, Lothair

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Log Tobacco Barn, Lothair

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Oconee River, Wheeler-Treutlen County Line

 

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Board-and-Batten Farmhouse, Treutlen County

treutlen-county-ga-board-and-batten-farmhouse-photograph-copyright-brian-brown-vanishing-south-georgia-usa-2017

This house has an addition at the rear, also of board-and-batten construction.

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